Gun Word of the Day: Dry Fire

Gun Word Of The Day

Gun Word Of The Day

Dry Fire [drahy] [fahyuhr]

- verb-ish

1. The act of going through the complete sequence of events to fire a gun, but without use of ammunition. Dry fire is a practice technique where the gun is cocked, aimed at a safe practice target and backstop, and trigger pulled. The guns striker or hammer falls on an empty chamber, thereby completing the act of firing a gun, but without discharge of a projectile and associated noise, recoil and flash. Dry fire practice requires strict attention to the safety rules of shooting and ammunition should never be in the same area where dry fire practice occurs.

2. Dry firing only sounds dirty, unless you’re accustomed to visiting, umm, dance clubs where rhythmic movement in a skillful and defined pattern of steps is not valued or required. In these cases, dry-firing could be considered distasteful.

You can find detailed instructions on how to safely dry fire practice here, and you can find even more tips in our latest book, The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition.

Gun Word of the Day: Pill

Gun Word Of The Day

Gun Word Of The Day

Pill [pil]

- noun

1. A small globular or rounded mass of medicinal substance, usually covered with a hard coating, that is swallowed whole.

2. Term used in place of ‘projectile’ or ‘bullet’ by some gun writers who have either written too many similar articles and run out of unique ways to express themselves, and/or aging males who have a subconscious need to purchase orally administered sexual enhancement products.  Pardon us for being redundant.

3. Use of the word ‘pill’ in place of ‘bullet’, ‘projectile’ , ‘slug’ or even ‘lead’ is somewhat analogous to 40-something parents telling their kids’ friends to come “hang out and chillax betches.”

Remember, friends don’t let friends say silly things like “pill”

Gun Word of the Day: Hammer

 

Gun Word Of The Day

Gun Word Of The Day

Hammer [ham-er]

- noun

1. The part of a firearm designed to provide energy to the firing pin in order to strike the primer of a cartridge. Some hammers, such as those on older revolvers, have the firing pin attached to the hammer and directly impact the primer. Others, generally on more modern designs, impact a transfer bar or mechanism to provide energy to the firing pin. The hammer of a gun does not have to be exposed or visible. For example, the Smith and Wesson 642 revolver and M1 Garand semi-automatic rifle both have internal hammers.

It's Hammer Time!

It's Hammer Time!

2. Easily confused with similar terms. For example, Hammer Time is not an appropriate usage in the context of guns. Unless you got slick moves and a pair of parachute pants capable of providing wind power for San Francisco or maybe smuggling dozens of illegal immigrants across the border. Otherwise, you can’t touch this.

Important Safety Tip: While it’s OK to cock your hammer, don’t ever hammer your… Umm. Never mind.

Gun Word of the Day: Rack

Gun Word Of The Day

Gun Word Of The Day

Rack [rak]

- verb

1. To cycle the slide of a semi-automatic gun. Usually refers to the procedure of operating a handgun where complete cycling of the slide ejects an empty cartridge case (if present) from the chamber, while moving a new cartridge from the magazine into the chamber. This action basically clears the chamber of an existing empty, or full, cartridge and prepares the gun for firing a new cartridge. Repeated ‘racking’ of the slide will eventually empty the gun of all cartridges. Racking the slide is also used to clear jams or malfunctions. On the range, or in a competition, a command to rack the slide may be used in a couple of different circumstances. When a semi-automatic gun is first loaded, the slide must be racked to load a cartridge into the chamber so the gun is prepared to fire. Second, a range officer may issue a rack the slide command when shooting is finished to verify that a gun is empty.

2. Ummm. This should describe it…

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