New Daisy Slime Oozing Targets

Daisy's Slime Oozing Targets add a whole new level of fun over paper targets.

Daisy’s Slime Oozing Targets add a whole new level of fun over paper targets.

Here’s a neat idea sure to capture a young shooter’s attention. New Slime Oozing targets from Daisy provide fun interactivity with hardly any mess. I saw these recent at a media shooting event and had to check them out when I saw experienced gun writers bypassing real gun tables to head to the Daisy booth. That’s right – a bunch of normally serious folks were gleefully plinking away at these targets.

Each hit from a BB or pellet gun releases a little bit of pinkish-reddish slime ooze that clearly indicates a hit. Right now, two types of targets are available: a half watermelon and a set of three soda cans. The ooze in the center is lightweight, so the targets are easy to hang on a normal target stand – no special support is required. The slime itself is thick and gelatinous, so while it will ooze from a BB hole, it’s unlikely to drip all the way to the ground. The slime dries pretty quickly and automatically seals the holes, so when finished for the day, take it home and bring it out again on your next trip.

You can find these online and at sporting retailers for less than $20.

NRA Annual Meeting Day 1

It’s that time of year again.

Can you tell the NRA is in town?

Can you tell the NRA is in town?

We’re at the National Rifle Association Annual Meeting in beautiful downtown Indianapolis. I’ve not been to Indianapolis before, but will be back. The downtown area is fantastic. It’s filled with old buildings refurbished with modern interiors. Stores, restaurants and hangouts – it’s a great town for a convention. Indianapolis has clearly rolled out the welcome mat. The people are friendly and there’s been a strong police presence to help manage traffic and crowds. Most of them have been asking attendees about all the new products they saw inside. Officer Friendly lives here.

As there will be a million and seven articles about the newest mainstream products, we’ll be covering the more unusual and interesting offerings here over the next three days, so stay tuned for end of day updates. Let’s take a look at some Day 1 finds.

A Sixpack of Pure Fun From the Target Factory

This booth display stopped me in my tracks. Why? Shooting reactive targets is simply way more fun than shooting holes in paper. While there are plenty of “reactive” targets that are fine for outdoor ranges, I don’t know of many (any?) that are OK to use at indoor ranges.

NRA_Target_bottles-1-4

The NRA Target Bottles are made from a “plasticky” material that allows bullets to pass through, creating only a smaller-than-bullet-diameter hole. Unlike the outdoor target cubes, these are ultra lightweight. You can hang them from a Target Factory frame made of the same material, or, if you shoot at an indoor range, you can use the Target Factory adapter and hang some bottles from those motorized target hangers that zoom back and forth.

NRA_Target_bottles-1-5

These NRA Target Bottles have each been shot about 100 times with everything from .22 to .50 caliber.

You know these come in six packs, right? Spares are packaged just like your favorite long neck beer or glass bottle soda. They’ll handle most any caliber from .22LR to .50 and you can shoot each bottle hundreds of times before it’s destroyed beyond recognition.

 It’s one of those “why didn’t I think of that” ideas. Brilliant.

Read the rest at Beretta USA!

 

Three Practice Drills That Will Make You A Better Shooter

Excuse me sir, how do you get to the Bianchi Cup?

Practice, practice, practice!

It doesn't take much to develop a good practice routine. Gun, ammo, a computer printer and a few paper plates will do.

It doesn’t take much to develop a good practice routine. Gun, ammo, a computer printer and a few paper plates will do.

As fun as it can be, going to the range, standing there and plinking away at targets isn’t the most efficient way to improve your shooting. Like anything else you want to get good at, you need to structure your practice. After all, NFL players don’t just wander around stadiums throwing and kicking balls at random things. When they’re not busy getting arrested, they have a practice regimen designed to improve core skills and measure progress. I think the key concept here is “measure progress.” If you can’t come up with some way to document and track your skills, how do you know if you’re getting better?

Maybe I’m still emotionally scarred from piano lesson practice, but the concept of “practice” doesn’t sound all that fun to me. Fortunately, we’re talking about shooting guns here, so given the inherent fun with that activity in general, it’s much easier to develop practice routines that are also fun. Here are a few drills that I’ve run across that I like. They’re fun. They build your skills. They help you measure progress. And most importantly, they address some of the different types of gun skills you might need.

The 45 Drill

If you want to get all Annie Oakley, pick up some of these self-sealing target cubes. They're close enough to five inches for the 45 drill. Better yet, they move when you shoot them, so you target gets more challenging with each shot.

If you want to get all Annie Oakley, pick up some of these self-sealing target cubes. They’re close enough to five inches for the 45 drill. Better yet, they move when you shoot them, so you target gets more challenging with each shot.

The 45 drill is a great way to develop speed while getting shots on target. I love this one because it’s so darn simple at least one of my two dogs could remember the steps. I think this drill was developed by gun writer Richard Mann, but I’m not 100% sure on that. If you have other information, please feel free to share in the comments.

How simple is it? Can you remember the number 45? Great. You’ve almost got it. The drill has four elements of things related to the number five. You fire five shots, in five seconds, at a five-inch target that’s five yards away. Get it? Don’t get all worked up about the five inches at five yards thing. Bring a couple of paper plates to the range. That’s close enough.

Oh. One more thing. You have to start from your concealed carry holster – that’s part of your five second time limit. If your range doesn’t allow draws, or if you’re not comfortable with that skill yet, no worries. Just start from a low-ready position with your gun pointing to the ground in front of you at a forty-five degree angle.

Read the rest at OutdoorHub.com!

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what’s behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that…

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what's behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that...

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what's behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that...

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