Three Practice Drills That Will Make You A Better Shooter

Excuse me sir, how do you get to the Bianchi Cup?

Practice, practice, practice!

It doesn't take much to develop a good practice routine. Gun, ammo, a computer printer and a few paper plates will do.

It doesn’t take much to develop a good practice routine. Gun, ammo, a computer printer and a few paper plates will do.

As fun as it can be, going to the range, standing there and plinking away at targets isn’t the most efficient way to improve your shooting. Like anything else you want to get good at, you need to structure your practice. After all, NFL players don’t just wander around stadiums throwing and kicking balls at random things. When they’re not busy getting arrested, they have a practice regimen designed to improve core skills and measure progress. I think the key concept here is “measure progress.” If you can’t come up with some way to document and track your skills, how do you know if you’re getting better?

Maybe I’m still emotionally scarred from piano lesson practice, but the concept of “practice” doesn’t sound all that fun to me. Fortunately, we’re talking about shooting guns here, so given the inherent fun with that activity in general, it’s much easier to develop practice routines that are also fun. Here are a few drills that I’ve run across that I like. They’re fun. They build your skills. They help you measure progress. And most importantly, they address some of the different types of gun skills you might need.

The 45 Drill

If you want to get all Annie Oakley, pick up some of these self-sealing target cubes. They're close enough to five inches for the 45 drill. Better yet, they move when you shoot them, so you target gets more challenging with each shot.

If you want to get all Annie Oakley, pick up some of these self-sealing target cubes. They’re close enough to five inches for the 45 drill. Better yet, they move when you shoot them, so you target gets more challenging with each shot.

The 45 drill is a great way to develop speed while getting shots on target. I love this one because it’s so darn simple at least one of my two dogs could remember the steps. I think this drill was developed by gun writer Richard Mann, but I’m not 100% sure on that. If you have other information, please feel free to share in the comments.

How simple is it? Can you remember the number 45? Great. You’ve almost got it. The drill has four elements of things related to the number five. You fire five shots, in five seconds, at a five-inch target that’s five yards away. Get it? Don’t get all worked up about the five inches at five yards thing. Bring a couple of paper plates to the range. That’s close enough.

Oh. One more thing. You have to start from your concealed carry holster – that’s part of your five second time limit. If your range doesn’t allow draws, or if you’re not comfortable with that skill yet, no worries. Just start from a low-ready position with your gun pointing to the ground in front of you at a forty-five degree angle.

Read the rest at OutdoorHub.com!

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what’s behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that…

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what's behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that...

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what's behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that...

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