What Has More Energy? A 3 ½” 12 Gauge Buckshot Load or a Throat Punch By Mike Tyson?

Find out with the Cartridge Comparison Guide, Second Edition

I now have all the answers.

Not because I’m some sort of genius, but because I met the guy who HAS found all the answers at this year’s Professional Outdoor Media Association (POMA) Conference.

Cartridge Comparison Guide Second Edition

Cartridge Comparison Guide Second Edition

His name is Andrew and he created the Cartridge Comparison Guide, now in its second edition.

Thanks to Andrew, I am now able to quickly research definitive answers to important questions like…

 

Question: Is the muzzle energy of the Winchester 12 gauge, 15 pellet, #00 buckshot, 3 ½” load more or less than getting punched in the throat by Mike Tyson?

Answer: It’s a trick question. While the muzzle energy of this load is 3,780 foot-pounds, you can’t really measure the impact of a Mike Tyson throat punch as he prefers 7 punch combo’s led by a jab.

 

Question: Which has a greater sectional density? The .577 Nitro Express Barnes Bullet or Rosie O’Donnell?

Answer: Aha! Tricked you again! You can’t accurately compare the .577′s sectional density of .313 with infinity!

 

Question: Which requires more energy? Stopping a .35 Whelen 200 grain projectile once it has traveled 300 yards or prying Lindsey Lohan from a one of Hollywood’s Hookah Lounge bar stools?

Answer: Well, according to the Cartridge Comparison Guide, a .35 Whelen 200 grain projectile will be moving at about 1,916 feet per second at 300 yards, which translates to, let’s see, carry the one, 1,630 foot-pounds of energy. As of last reports, officials still have not managed to pry the wayward actress from her bar stool, so we’ll have to get back to you on this one.

 

Question: What exerts more force? Martha Stewart hot-glueing doilies onto a festive holiday wreath or the recoil of a .221 Remington Fireball?

Answer: The .221 Remington Fireball with a 40 grain Hornady projectile exerts about 1.62 foot-pounds of recoil, while sticking doilies only requires .731 foot-pounds using general purpose hot glue.

 

Question: OK, last chance to improve your score. Which of the following is more likely to create a tear-drop or bell-shaped wound channel? The .17 Remington Fireball 20 grain bullet or Louie Anderson hitting the water from the 5 meter board in ABC’s new celebrity diving show, Splash?

Answer: Due to its 4,000 feet per second velocity and light bullet construction, the .17 Fireball is likely to fragment, thereby creating a tear-drop shaped wound channel. Louie Anderson, currently weighing in at 400 pounds, is likely to empty the pool, rendering wound-channel measurements impossible.

 

Of course, if you want to do more mundane things like find the best hunting cartridge that will minimize felt-recoil, while delivering a certain amount of energy at 300 yards, the Cartridge Comparison Guide will help you do that too. It’s chock full of tables that rank and sort data like bullet weight, muzzle velocity, down range energy, bullet momentum, sectional density and recoil energy.

So if you wanted to know which has more recoil energy, the .270 Winchester with a 150 grain bullet traveling at 2,950 feet per second or a 7×57 Mauser with a 170 grain bullet traveling at  2,545 feet per second, you would just flip to pages 46 and 47. You’ll find that, with an 8 pound rifle, you’ll experience 17.82 foot-pounds of recoil with the .270 load and 15.07 foot-pounds of recoil energy with the 7×57 Mauser. Or perhaps you want to settle the argument of which has more down range energy, the standard AR-15 or AK-47 load. Just look it up!

What the Cartridge Comparison Guide 2 is, and is not.

It is a comprehensive tool that “will help you gain the maximum benefit from a personalized cartridge selection.”

It is not a reloading guide. You will not find powder measure charges in this book.

It is comprehensive, covering cartridges from the .17 caliber to the .577 Nitro Express and everything in between.

It is not intended to interest Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

It is a directory of performance characteristics of factory available cartridges – even really rare and obscure ones.

It is not a guide for wildcat and proprietary cartridge performance.

It is a means of sucking up hours of your time. Productively!

It is not appropriate to bring for dinner table reading on romantic dates.

Winner of the Professional Outdoor Media Association Pinnacle Award for excellence, this book is a gold mine of information.

You can find the Cartridge Comparison Guide 2nd Edition here.

Also check out some of the posters produced by Chamberlain Development, like this American Standard Cartridge poster. It’s painstakingly produced to illustrate each cartridge in actual dimensions to within 4/1000 of an inch.

American Standard Cartridges - The Cartridge Comparison Guide

American Standard Cartridges Poster

 

 

Shooting Tip of the Day: Is That A Laser In Your Pocket?

Shooting Tip of the Day

Are you a neon pants packer? Have you ever seen one in public?

If you do happen to see someone cruising around with a steady or intermittent glow emanating from their pants pocket area, it means one of two things:

  1. They have a really, really, really serious urinary tract infection.
  2. The laser on their concealed pistol is going on by accident.

Sound farfetched?

Nope, this has happened to us. The right pistol, laser, activation button placement and holster combination can in fact do this. In our incident, it was a combination of side-activated laser grip buttons and a common inside-the-waistband holster. Overall pressure from love handles and the gun resulted in a glowing crotch. While not continuous, certain body movements would cause the laser to activate on and off throughout the day.

In addition to looking really strange, it’s hard on the laser batteries.

Do you have a laser on your carry gun? If so, be sure to check it out to make sure it’s not lasering things inside your pants!

 

8 Shooting Tips: How Not To Look Like An Amateur Shooter

Even if you’re new to shooting, you may have heard names like Julie GolobRob LeathamSara AhrensIain Harrison, and Tori Nonaka. Whether you know them from the competitive circuit, see them on shows like Top Shot, or your obsessive shooting sports fan neighbor just can’t stop rattling off stats about them, one thing is clear. They have a reputation of being experienced, no make that expert, shooters.

But wait, you’re new to this whole thing. How do you make that first trip to the range, gun store, or even a friend’s house to check out a gun or two without looking like a total doofus? Admit it, we all want to be cool and look comfortable and confident when learning new shooting tips and gun handling skills. Like all new things, learning how to handle guns can be intimidating. But how do you take the first step and learn basic gun and shooting technique now that Miss Manners’ Sooper Dooper Guide to Shooting Etiquette is out of print?

Check out these shooting tips and you’ll be safe AND looking like an pro shooter, or at least a well-rounded intermediate, in no time flat.

1. Gun Safety Tip: Practice ‘Open sesame’

When someone hands you a gun, whether it’s in a store, at the range, in their house, or at an armory in Kandahar, Afghanistan, point it at something safe, like the floor, and immediately open the slide (or cylinder if it’s a revolver) to verify that it is in fact unloaded. (Tweet This!)

Do remember to keep your finger off the trigger while doing this. That alone will get you 12 extra bonus points! But still remember, a gun is ALWAYS loaded. Even after you’ve opened it to verify that it’s empty. We know, it’s kind of confusing. Just trust us on this one. If you pretend that it’s always loaded, you’ll never do something silly like pointing it at someone or something you really don’t want to shoot.

2. Proper Handgun Grip: Don’t drink tea at the range

How not to grip a gun - the teacup or cup and saucer handgun grip

A teacup, or cup and saucer, grip is about this effective. Hint: Don’t do this.

Friends don’t let friends enjoy tea while shooting. Save it for the post range outing ice cream social.

If you watch some of the faux shooting shows on TV, you might hear someone mention a teacup grip. Some call it a cup and saucer grip.

Just to be clear, a cup and saucer grip is not a compliment or indicator of social refinement. It’s an observation of poor shooting form. (Tweet This)

If you’re going to use two hands to shoot a handgun, you might as well get some benefit out of the support hand. Rather than cupping it under the base of the grip like a teacup saucer, how about snugging it right along side the grip so your support hand fingers can reach around the front? You’ll be amazed at how little your feisty little pistol or revolver jumps when you use a proper grip.

Lack of recoil control is a malady that affects millions of Americans. Only you can help by using a proper grip. (Tweet This)

Here’s a great video that shows how to achieve a proper grip.

3. Safe Shooting Tip: Know that eye and ear protection IS cool

OK confess. You don’t particularly like to wear helmets while riding a bike either. It looks kind of dorky. And you’re probably not going to fall on your head right?

When it comes to the need for hearing protection at the shooting range, there is no probably. There is only absolutely. As in positively.

Every shot you fire without ear protection WILL permanently damage your hearing. (Tweet This)

And each additional shot after that WILL damage it more. You probably won’t know it for a while. Maybe years. But it WILL happen. Same thing with eye protection. If you shoot, stuff WILL bounce back at you and hit you in the face. Bullet fragments. Target fragments. Backstop fragments. Irritable forest critters. And who knows what else? While every shot without eye protection does not result in vision loss, it’s only a matter of time before something wrecks one or both of your eyes. They don’t react well to metal fragments and flaming powder gasses.

The easiest way to spot a new, and foolish, shooter is to look for those too cool to wear shooting glasses and ear protection. There are thousands of stylish eye and ear protection options out there so you can even look cool sporting your common sense safety gear.

4. Handgun Grip Technique: Don’t be all thumbs

Crossed thumbs shooting grip

This grip technique may cause you to bleed all over the shooting range. We don’t recommend it.

I can share this new-shooter tip from a vantage point of, ummm, let’s call it personal experience.

Remember Ghostbusters? And how it’s really bad to cross the streams of the Proton Pack particle accelerators? Well there’s a similar rule of thumb (pun fully intended) for shooting semi-automatic pistols. Don’t cross your thumbs. See the picture in this article? Don’t do that! Sooner or later, that thing called a slide is going zoom backwards at Warp 17 and slice the dickens out of the webby, sensitive skin between your thumb and your index finger. If you want to splatter copious amounts of blood around the range, feel free, but once is enough for me.

Fortunately there’s an easy way to avoid bleeding all over your range. Don’t cross the streams.

When shooting a semi-automatic pistol, never cross your thumbs! If you do, you will get blood all over your gun! (Tweet This)

Point both thumbs forward and keep them on the weak hand side of your handgun. Your hand, and your local drug store, will thank you.

The video linked in Step 2 above shows excellent thumb form.

5. Gun Safety Tip: Learn to be cold to your shooting range companions

Being cold at the shooting range isn’t rude. Or event anti-social. In fact, it’s not Cruel To Be Kindit’s cool to be kind.  Kind of cold that is.

How can you be cold at the range? When you hear “Range Cold!” that means it’s not hot. Which means there is no shooting. Or even pretending to shoot. Which means put your gun on the table. Which means don’t play with it or show your friends anything about it that involves touching your gun. The table and the gun become one. A hot item. And you’re suddenly the third wheel in that relationship. Keep it that way until you hear “Range Hot!” Then, and only then, you can try for a threesome with the gun / table love festival.

When the range is cold, do NOT touch your gun. At all! Step away from the shooting table until the range is hot. (Tweet This)

Bonus tip: If you want to look like a real pro, then don’t just put your gun(s) on the table when you hear “Range Cold!” Step away from the shooting table and stay there the whole time the range is cold. This is a sooper dooper move that let’s nearby shooters know that you are not messing with your gun(s) while the range is cold. It’s very considerate and they will love you for it. Who knows? You might develop your own new relationship while your gun and the table are focused on theirs.

6. Shooting Terminology Tip: Ban the word “Clip” from your vocabulary

You know how you can spot a high school prom couple at an exclusive restaurant? Like when the pimply mannish boy requests A-1 Steak Sauce with his Chateaubriand?  Well, there’s a similar thing in shooting – when people carelessly throw around words like clip.

Clips and magazines are both legitimate shooting related objects. While sometimes subtle, there are differences.

A clip is a device used to hold cartridges for the purpose of storage, packing, and easy loading into a magazine. Clips were a big deal back when the world had anger issues expressed by frequent large-scale wars. Five or ten rounds of ammo might be attached to a clip, which would allow a soldier to slide the rounds into the magazine of his rifle or handgun quickly and easily. Clips are still used today. Some .223 or 5.56 ammunition comes on clips to make it easier to load lots of rounds into a magazine at once.

A magazine is the container that holds cartridges for the purpose of feeding them into the chamber of a firearm. Magazines can be built into the gun, as with many rifles, or they can be removable, as with most semi-automatic pistols and AR type rifles. That thing that falls out the bottom of a Glock? That’s a magazine.

Confused? No problem. We’ve got a near fail-safe tip for you. These days you’re pretty safe referring to most things that hold bullets as a magazine. More often than not, you’ll be correct referring to it that way.

Mixing the words ‘clip’ and ‘Glock’ in the same sentence is a sure-fire way to show you’ve still got a few things to learn.

7. Shooting Tip: Don’t do The Bernie

While the movie Weekend at Bernie’s qualifies a cult movie and spawned it’s own cool dance moves, it really doesn’t play well at the range. Dancing tends to throw off your aim.

Nor does leaning way, way, way backwards when you shoot have any practical value. You see, there is little chance that your gun will suddenly turn around and start chasing you, so the backwards lean position really provides no tactical advantage.

Leaning backward while shooting a pistol provides no tactical advantage. And it makes you look like a n00b! (Tweet This)

if you want to look awesome and skilled like the pro shooters, lean forward into the gun, and towards your target when you shoot. If your shoulders are just a tad in front of your belt buckle you’re in great position. Not only do you look tough, all that aggressive body position really helps to control recoil and keep your shots on target.

After all, you never see Chuck Norris leaning away from those nameless henchmen do you?

8. Last but not least: Don’t be shy about asking questions!

The best way to look like a pro shooter? Even if you’re new to the whole thing? Ask questions! If you’re not sure about something, just ask. You can even ask a pro. We’ve found them to be nice and helpful folks. It’s OK. One of the most pleasant surprises from getting involved in the shooting community has been the overwhelming friendliness of the people. You just might be surprised how far people will go to help a new shooter.

Have fun, be safe, and ask a question if you’re not sure!

Be sure to check out our latest book, The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition. It’s available in print and Kindle format at Amazon:

The Rookie's Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition

The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition

Find gun holster options in our new book, The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters - available at Amazon.com! Learn more about our Insanely Practical Guides!

Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters

 

Book Review: Shoot! Your Guide to Shooting and Competition by Julie Golob

shoot-julie-golobThree guesses as to who wrote this book. Here are a few hints:

  • She roasts her own coffee. We’re still waiting for her to send us some of her famous “Powder Burn in Major Power Factor” roast…
  • Rumor has it that she uses a fembot body double to help master her busy schedule
  • She has acquired all five Sankara stones as seen in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

You guessed it – none other than Smith & Wesson Team Captain Julie Golob. Learn a little more about Julie from our recent interview – and check out the book. It’s a great resource for both new and experienced shooters.

Available Here Shoot! Your Guide to Shooting and Competition by Julie Golob

Do You Make These 5 Range Mistakes?

Spoiler Alert: One of these 5 range mistakes involves the Hokey Pokey.

We do a lot of our testing and recreational shooting at a public range, located in an unnamed and top-secret national forest. You can assume that it borders the Area 51 Dreamland property if you like. While the state maintains the facility, it is unsupervised and there is no range officer on duty. People who shoot there put on their big kid shorts, take responsibility for their actions, and generally self-administer range etiquette and safety. Kind of like the old days.

In any given week, there are plenty of examples of less than stellar range behavior and most of them are a result of simple ignorance – not malicious or willingly irresponsible behavior. Although there is the occasional drunk security officer. Not everyone out there consumes gun magazines and books by the metric ton as we do.

And add to that the fact that humans believe that they are genetically pre-wired to know how to operate a firearm. Well at least the males of our species seem to think so.

Why do men think they are genetically pre-wired knowing how to safely operate a gun? (Tweet This)

In short, we find plenty of opportunities to provide firm, but good-intentioned advice and guidance to newer shooters at this facility. You see, we’re on a training mission from God.

Here are some of the more common range etiquette faux pas that we see…

1. The Side Slide Swipe

We value our love handles. Don’t shoot them off.

Yes, dieting is hard, but far preferable to ballistic waist reduction. (Tweet This)

The Side Slide Swipe happens when a shooter tries to rack the slide of a semi-automatic pistol. Given the simple geometry of us human folk, we generally have hands and arms mounted on the sides while the eyes face forward. So, standing at the range, naturally facing the target, the natural motion to rack a slide is (from a right handed point of view) to  point the gun to the left, grasp the slide with your left hand, and rack. Nice and easy. The only real problem with this method is that your gun is pointed directly at all the shooters to the left of you.

It actually takes a bit of effort and concentration to rotate you body so that the gun is pointed downrange while racking the slide.

It’s worth the trouble though. If not for yourself, do it for the love handles. Please.

2. The Itchy Magnet Finger

Apparently the best way to scratch your index finger while at the range is to rub it around the inside of the trigger guard.

We know that index finger trouble is hard-wired into our human DNA, like nose picking at traffic lights, because we see it all the time. (Tweet This)

Yes, the magnetic draw of a gun trigger is an irresistible force of nature for most index fingers – especially for new shooters. The millisecond that gun metal contacts the hand, the finger is magnetically latched on to the trigger. The finger just belongs there doesn’t it? If it didn’t why is there a big hole and a neat little handle to rest your finger on?

There’s endless debate about the practical value, or lack thereof, of competitive shooting. One thing is for sure though. Enter a few IDPA or Steel Challenge matches and you will most certainly be cured of any trigger finger discipline problems.

3. The Hand Trouble

While not as frequent an event at indoor ranges, Cold Range scenarios are a regular part of shooting at many outdoor ranges and clubs. Basically calling Cold Range gives folks an opportunity to safely go down range, change targets, clean up their mess, or whatever. Without fear of getting shot in the backside. Cold Range means no shooting. While not as literal as “no shooting,” a command of Cold Range also means “don’t mess with your guns.”

Yeah, we know. But your gun isn’t loaded!

Do everyone a favor and save the hand trouble problems.

Play a game of Angry Birds or catch up on some good old-fashioned texting while the range is cold. Just don’t fondle your firearms. (Tweet This)

4. The Back Seat Shooter

Back seat drivers are the worst. Frustrating, dangerous, and generally too wimpy to move forward and drive themselves. So are back seat shooters.

These are the ones that hang back too far behind the shooting line so that the muzzles of their various firearms are actually behind other shooters on either side of them. Is it the result of some instinctive Dirty Harry reflex to have the drop on everyone else at the range? We don’t know, but as nice as you seem to be, I don’t trust you! Not when you have a loaded gun behind my back anyway.

Step on up to the shooting line.

Look at the bright side, you’ll be a little closer to the target and shoot a better group! (Tweet This)

5. The Hokey Pokey and Turn Yourself About

Turning your self all around? No, that’s not what it’s all about at the range. Especially when you’re holding a handgun.

Handguns are really short. Even shorter than Ryan Seacrest. So be careful turning around. (Tweet This)

That means when you turn your head around to say something like “Hey look! I just shot a pomegranite to smitherines!” that your gun will most likely be pointing at the dude beside you or even someone behind you. If you see people around you dropping like Jersey Shore cast members, it may be a result of your gun handling skills.

Feel free to put your handgun forward, and even put your right foot in. You can even do the Hokey Pokey, just don’t turn yourself around.

What bad range habits do you see out there?

Find gun holster options in our new book, The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters - available at Amazon.com! Learn more about our Insanely Practical Guides!

Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters

Rockin’ Video Preview: Galco Ankle Holsters

We’re doing an exhaustive torture test of three Galco ankle holster products:

Galco Ankle Glove

Galco Ankle Lite

Galco Ankle Glove Calf Strap

While that’s going on, we thought we’d post a quick video preview set to a hoppin’ Elvis theme song. This video will:

  • Prevent you from making a fool of yourself when you call Galco
  • Eliminate the need for you to read the enclosed instructions
  • Show you my sexy leg

More to follow in the written review. In the meantime, enjoy the video!

Galco Ankle Holster roundup

Read about more carry styles and over 120 different gun holsters in The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters - available at Amazon.com! Learn more about our Insanely Practical Guides!

Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters

Gun Review: Glock 17 Generation 4 9mm Full Size Pistol

Approximate Street Price: $549.00

www.teamglock.com

The Good The Bad The Ugly Our Rating
The new grip texture is exceptionally effective. We really like it! We found the ejection pattern to be a little wonky and erratic with most types of ammunition. The VPC, CSGV and Brady folks still can’t claim that Glocks can pass through metal detectors. Truthfully anyway. 4 Nuns Four Nuns!

 

The Glock 17 Gen IV

The Glock 17 Gen IV

When the folks at Glock sent us a shiny new Glock 17 Generation IV to evaluate, we were obviously excited. After years of refinement, the Glock would now be able to pass through metal detectors and make true all those hysterical, pantie-wetting exaggerations we’ve been hearing for years. Right? Well, unfortunately no, but a lot of other enhancements have been made in the new models. Let’s take a closer look.

First Impressions of the Glock 17 Gen 4

  • Our G17 test gun came with three (17) round magazines. And a Glock magazine loader tool. We appreciate that as three magazines represents the minimum configuration for a self-defense gun. As a side note, we also really appreciate the street price of additional magazines for Glocks. $20-25 if you shop a bit. Compared to $40-50 magazines from other manufacturers who-will-not-be-named, that’s pretty darn reasonable.
  • Shooting it sideways did not make us look any more fearsome on the range. Nor did any Hollywood producers call offering us bad guy roles in new action films. We did get puzzled looks from other shooters at the range however – and one tried to sell us some crack.
  • The new G17 is a really comfortable gun to hold, and more importantly, shoot. It feels solid in the hand and has no tendency to slide around. No skateboard tape or rubber grip sleeves required, even if you’re a nervous sweaty-hand type.

Differences from Glock Generation 3 models

  • The Glock 17 magazine release is a subtle, yet effective change

    The Glock 17 magazine release is a subtle, yet effective change

    Magazine Release Button: It’s been embiggened, but in a really useful way. It’s got about twice the surface area of the previous design. We love the feel and ease of one-handed operation of the newly designed mag release. By the way, it’s also reversible so righties and lefties have an out-of-the-box solution. Very nice – a minor, but very noticeable enhancement.

  • Glock Gen III vs. Gen IV Grip Texture

    Glock Gen III vs. Gen IV Grip Texture

    Grip Texture: This is perhaps the most noticeable change from the Generation III models. The new pattern is the same on the sides, front, and back of the grip unlike the Gen III models which had a different pattern on the sides. The molded “skateboard tape” pattern on the sides of the Gen III grip never did much for us. Not enough grip. The Gen IV models use an entirely different pattern – raised dots that are completely separated from one another. We found this new pattern to be exceptionally effective for maintaining a solid grip – even here in the humid (and sweaty) lowcountry of South Carolina. The pattern almost feels rough and we had concerns that extended shooting would be tough on the hands, but it wasn’t. For that one person out there who still shoots with the support hand index finger on the front of the trigger guard, the new texture pattern there is comprised of a series of horizontal ridges. Just saying.

  • Recoil Spring Assembly: Like the Generation III models, the Gen IV features a captive recoil spring assembly that makes field stripping a little less embarrassing in the event you’re not paying attention to what you’re doing and let the spring fly. Unlike the Gen III models, the new Glock 17 utilizes a dual spring design. An inner full-length spring is partially surrounded by a metal sleeve, and both of those are surrounded by a partial length outer spring. According to Glock, the dual spring design not only reduces felt recoil, but increases the lifespan of the spring assembly. One item to note if you own or buy a Gen IV Glock 17: Glock has released several versions of the spring assembly and will supply customers with the most recent one if you call customer service at 877-745-8523. Have your model and serial number handy. Our test gun was fitted with an earlier model spring assembly version and the replacement set did not arrive in time for this review. However, we did not note any reliability or other problems, excepting the erratic ejection pattern discussed in this article. When the new assembly arrives, we’ll see if the ejection pattern issue changes and post and update if appropriate.
  • The new Glock Gen IV recoil spring assembly

    The new Glock Gen IV recoil spring assembly

    Modular Back Strap System: This is a fancy marketing term for ‘different grip sizes.’ We know this because we’re marketing people by trade and words like ‘modular’ are very much in vogue on Madison Avenue. Lot’s of current generation pistols offer this feature, but the Gen IV Glocks take a different, and we think better approach. The default grip is a solid, one-piece, molded assembly that’s ready to go out of the box. This default size is a tad (a tad is about .08 inches by the way) smaller than the Gen III Glock 17 in terms of distance to trigger. Adding on the included medium grip panel makes the Gen IV exactly equal to the standard Gen III in terms of trigger reach. The large grip panel makes it a tad bigger. The difference with the Glock approach is that the smallest setting is permanent – you simply add to additional panels to that to make the grip larger. Compare to a Beretta PX4 for example. On that pistol, the back of the grip is ‘empty’ and you insert one of three different size panels to size the grip. Not a huge deal, but I kind of like the idea of having a very solid and complete grip as a starting point from which to build. An interesting and efficient approach to the  problem of multiple grip sizes.

The Tactical Light Issue

We’ve had personal experience with older style Glock 22′s with mounted weapon lights. Utterly reliable without a mounted light, we’ve seen the same gun deteriorate to below average performance once a light was attached. According to X-Box geniuses with additional Mall Ninja certification, this had something to do with polymer frame flex characteristics on recoil. Whatever. In any case, we decided to give the Gen IV G17 a thorough workout with a Streamlight TLR-1 – the same light that has given us fits on older Glocks. Results? Awesome. We couldn’t make it fail. And we know a lot about failure. We shot an array of 115 grain and 124 grain high velocity self-defense ammo using a variety of grips (limp-sissy, medium, and strong) and function was flawless. Just for fun, we tried some ultra-light hand loads with the light mounted – 124 grain plated bullets loaded to about 1,050 feet per second. Again, function was flawless with weak and strong grips – even with ammo than can barely cycle the action.

Ejectile Dysfunction

Before our test model arrived, we had seen plenty of internet Couch Commando discussion about Gen IV Glocks having a tendency to eject brass straight back at the shooter. Other, apparently more knowledgeable, Recliner Rangers dismissed these observations as shooter error and ‘limp wristing.’ While we’re as limp wristed as the next guy, we decided to put this claim to the test. For starters, our model did have a bit of erratic ejection. With same bat grip and same bat ammo, ours would eject 80-90% of the brass out and back at about a 45 degree angle. No problem. The remainder did have a tendency to eject straight up. While they did not eject towards the face, they did on occasion land on top of our head. Good thing we’re not bald. We did a little experimentation on the Recliner Ranger limp wrist theory – shooting a series of rounds with a grip so solid that aim was impossible and another series with the most fairy-like hold we could muster – without getting beat up by other nearby shooters. Interestingly, there was no difference in the ejection pattern of significance. The solid grip did have a tendency to shift the pattern a little more to the side, but did not stop the occasional up and on-the-head brass fling. Our test gun came with an earlier version of the recoil spring assembly and when the newer recoil spring assembly arrives, we’ll run the test again – just for fun. In any case, this turned out to be a practical non-issue as no steaming hot brass hit us in the face. Internet myth in our opinion.

Relative Velocity

We thought it would be fun, and a great excuse to turn more money into noise, to see if the hexagonal rifling of the Glock 17 yielded any velocity difference one way or the other compared to something with similar barrel length and standard rifling – in this case a Beretta 92FS. While the Beretta has a potential velocity advantage with a 4.9″ barrel compared to the Glock’s 4.49″ barrel, we proceeded to try a few 9mm loads to see what happened. OK, we admit it, this test had no real practical or scientific value, but it did give us a great excuse to break out our Shooting Chrony Beta Master. Might as well share the results though:

Georgia Arms 124 grain Gold Dot
Glock 17: 1,235 fps
Beretta 92: 1,235 fps

124 Grain Berry’s Plated Handloads
Glock 17: 1,082 fps
Beretta 92: 1,082 fps

Interesting that the (non-scientific) results came in almost identical with the Glock having a half inch shorter barrel. Again, no real conclusions can be drawn, but this exercise did impress a number of novice shooters at the range today – and that’s gotta count for something.

Glock 17 Gen 4 Basic Stats:

  • Weight: 22.05 oz unloaded, 31.92 oz loaded
  • Length: 7.95″
  • Sight radius: 6.5″
  • Barrel length: 4.49″
  • Height: 5.43″
  • Width: 1.18″
  • Trigger pull weight: 5.5 lbs
  • Capacity: 17+1 rounds

 

He said She said
I really like this gun and don’t tell her, but I bought the evaluation sample. I hope to use it as my new Steel Challenge gun. One of the things I like about it is the crazy reliability. I like a gun that shoots equally well from any shooting position. As discussed in our review of the Glock 32, I tend to favor a gun that will still function and cycle no matter what type of grip I have. Just for fun, I tried this one with the most pathetic and lame grips imaginable and was unable to make it fail. That’s a good thing. I really like this one as well. Too big for most of my concealed carry needs though. Don’t tell him, but it’s going to become my new Steel Challenge gun! I really like the default (smallest) grip size. Gives me a perfect reach to the trigger with a natural grip. I also really like the default Glock sights. The “U” shaped rear sight with the white dot in front is really fast to pick up and great for Steel Challenge shooting. We’re reloaders and it would be nice to be able to shoot lead bullets as they are cheaper, but not a huge deal. I’ll just make him order plated bullets instead!

While you’re here, why not grab a copy of my free eBook, A Fistful of Shooting Tips? It’ll help make you a better handgun shooter and the envy of your range in no time!

 

Check out other My Gun Culture product reviews here!

 

Accessories available at Brownells


Find holster options in our new book, The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters - available at Amazon.com! Learn more about our Insanely Practical Guides!

Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters

Gun Word of the Day: Pill

Gun Word Of The Day

Gun Word Of The Day

Pill [pil]

- noun

1. A small globular or rounded mass of medicinal substance, usually covered with a hard coating, that is swallowed whole.

2. Term used in place of ‘projectile’ or ‘bullet’ by some gun writers who have either written too many similar articles and run out of unique ways to express themselves, and/or aging males who have a subconscious need to purchase orally administered sexual enhancement products.  Pardon us for being redundant.

3. Use of the word ‘pill’ in place of ‘bullet’, ‘projectile’ , ‘slug’ or even ‘lead’ is somewhat analogous to 40-something parents telling their kids’ friends to come “hang out and chillax betches.”

Remember, friends don’t let friends say silly things like “pill”

Half-Cocked: Gun Terminology Gone Bad…

Half-Cocked: Gun Terminology Gone Bad

Half-Cocked: Gun Terminology Gone Bad

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what’s behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that…

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what's behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that...

Rule Four: Always be sure of your target and what's behind it. And behind that. And behind that. And behind that...