Does Hot Caliber Jewelry Make You Hawt? We Ask Founder Manos Phoundoulakis

Manos Phoundoulakis - Hot Caliber

Manos Phoundoulakis – Hot Caliber founder busting some clays at the Hot Caliber station at The Shooting Industry Masters

We’re talking with Manos Phoundoulakis, founder of Hot Caliber Jewelry and master inventor behind the flattened bullet jewelry concept. Well, actually, when you dig a little deeper into the story, most of the credit for the idea goes to his partner and bride Kelle. Isn’t that the way it always is?

While shooting with Team Hot Caliber at the 2012 Shooting Industry Masters event, we were able to pick Manos’ brain about being ‘hawt’ with Hot Caliber jewelry. As a side note, the Masters event served as the launch for the custom edition benefitting USA Shooting.

My Gun Culture: Right off the bat, I need to clarify an important question. Do you need to actually be ‘hawt’ to wear Hot Caliber flattened bullet jewelry? Or do you have to at least perceive yourself as ‘hawt’ to wear this stuff?

Manos Phoundoulakis: No, actually that’s what’s great about Hot Caliber. If you’re not hot, and you wear Hot Caliber, you will become hot. We guarantee it! Be careful of not wearing your Hot Caliber jewelry though, you can lose your newly found hotness.

Hot Caliber Derringer Pendant - USA Shooting Benefit Edition

Hot Caliber Derringer Pendant – USA Shooting Benefit Edition

MGC: I understand you put together a special benefit program for USA Shooting. Can you tell us about that?

Manos: Earlier this year at the NRA Annual Meeting, we decided to put together a benefit program around the Shooting Industry Masters event.  The FMG Publications (editors note: American Handgunner, Guns Magazine, and American Cop Magazine) folks came up with the idea to benefit USA Shooting and right off the bat it was clear to me this was a great idea. You see, I’m Greek. The Olympics started in Greece. They weren’t shooting back then, but they were throwing stuff, and that counts for something. We didn’t invent the gun, but we do take credit for shot put.

MGC: So without divulging too many trade secrets, how do you make Hot Caliber flattened bullet jewelry?

Manos: After more than 4,000 rounds of testing, we now know what it’s going to take to create a perfect flattened bullet. Normally, we shoot 100 rounds of a specific ammo type, depending on the type and size of piece we want to make, at a big heavy piece of steel. Over time, I’ve figured out what exact brand and load will produce perfect flattened bullets of a given size. Then I get to sift through the dirt and retrieve the flattened bullets. At this point, I pick the three best and run them by a small committee to help identify the best overall bullet impression.

MGC: So people have to be small to be on the committee?

Manos: No, but they do have to have really good eyesight. The committee is small in number, not in size! At this point, I take the flattened bullet and mold it in a rubber molding compound. From there we cast the initial model. If it’s our general Hot Caliber product, that model gets cast in silver or gold, then it gets put into the jewelry. We use a lost wax casting method. I won’t bore you with the details, but there are many important steps involved in creating a piece of silver or gold jewelry with this technique. I’ll go ahead and claim that the Greeks invented the lost wax technique also – even though that probably isn’t true. Sometimes we use an oxidation technique to help bring out the visual texture. For the Masters Edition, we have to take one more molding process to engrave one or both sides, depending on the piece.

MGC: Since you use actual bullets to come up with these designs, when did Mayor Bloomberg contact you about outlawing Hot Caliber Jewelry in New York City?

Manos: Well I don’t know him personally. And quite frankly, he’s not very attractive, but he would be much more attractive if he were to be wearing Hot Caliber jewelry. Then he might lighten up a bit.

Hot Caliber flattened bullet cufflinks

Hot Caliber offers a variety of flattened bullet jewelry for men and women – pendants, rings, cufflinks, keychains, and more.

MGC: Hot Caliber jewelry is already pretty elegant stuff, but do you have plans to enter the “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” market? Maybe something Paris Hilton would wear?

Manos: Just between us, we’re thinking about a “Haute Calibre” line. But that’s secret.

MGC: If other organizations or companies want to create special Hot Caliber editions to sell or fundraise is there any way they could do that?

Manos: We do offer special editions and licensed manufacturing for sale on other websites/catalogs. I would personally love to make an edition for any of the US Armed forces, or a Soldiers Angels Edition…anything that could help support the people that risk their lives for our freedoms. I’d make a Nancy Pelosi edition, but she would probably use the money to take my guns away.

 

Be sure to check out the Hot Caliber collection at www.hotcaliber.com. Better yet, order a special edition piece to support USA Shooting!

Latest Shooting Buyers Guide Additions

My Gun Culture Shooters Buyers Guide

We’re introducing a new weekly article feature, and a whole new section of MyGunCulture.com this week. Our Shooters Buyers Guide provides a quick and easy reference to stuff that is a solid value – and works. Think of it as shooting tips for buyers.

We check out a lot of shooting gear – tactical lights, gun lasers, optics, red dot sights, ammunition, reloading supplies and equipment, shooting bags, holsters of all kinds, and much, much more. While we can’t do an in depth review of everything that crosses the shooting bench, we can help filter out what works well – and what doesn’t. If you see an item listed in our buyers guide, we’ve used it, we like it, and we believe in it.

Here are this weeks picks:

Sights, Optics, Lasers, Lights

TruGlo TFO Fiber Optic / Tritium Handgun Sights

Crimson Trace LG850 Lasergrips – Glock Compact and Full Size Models

Aimpoint Micro H-1 Red Dot Sight

Crimson Trace Lightguard for Glock Pistols

Crimson Trace Lasergrips For Glock Full Size and Compact Models

Holsters

Blade-Tech IDPA Competition Pack with SRB (Sting Ray Belt) Holster

5.11 Tactical COVRT Z.A.P. 6 (Zone Assault Pack)

Galco Ankle Glove Holster

Blackhawk Leather Magazine Pouch

Galco Ankle Glove Holster

Blackhawk Sportster Standard Concealment Holster

Ammo

Hornady Critical Duty 9mm +P 135 grain Flexlock

Remington Golden Saber .45 ACP +P 185 grain JHP

CorBon DPX .357 Sig 125 Grain Ammo

American Eagle .223 Ammo – Reloaders Bargain

Federal’s Guard Dog .45 ACP – Expands Like All Get Out

Hornady Critical Defense .38 Special +P 100 grain

Speer Gold Dot 9mm +P Bonded Hollow Points

CorBon 9mm +P 115 grain JHP

Shooting Accessories

Gunzilla Gun Cleaner, Lubricant, and Protectant – Look Ma! No Stink!

ESS Crossbow Eyeshields – Eye Protection with Style

Slipstream and Slipstream STYX Weapons Lubricants

Books

Shoot! Your Guide to Shooting and Competition by Julie Golob

The Gun Digest Book of Combat Handgunnery by Massad Ayoob

American Heroes in Special Operations by Oliver North

GunDigest Shooter’s Guide to the 1911 by Robert Campbell

Reloading Equipment

Shooting Chrony Beta Master Chronograph

Forster Case Trimmer

Laser Review: Crimson Trace Green Laserguard for Glock LG-452

The Crimson Trace Green Laserguard for Glock Handguns

Green with envy. The brand new Crimson Trace Green Laserguard for Glocks

Green with envy. The brand new Crimson Trace Green Laserguard for Glocks

My Glock 31 Gen 4 with Crimson Trace LG-850 Lasergrips is now green with envy. Because of my Glock 17 Gen 4 that is now sporting the hot off the line Crimson Trace Green Laserguard LG-452.

Following up on the sneak previews at this years NRA Annual Meeting, Crimson Trace is just about to release a whole slew of green laser models. In September, we’ll see Laserguard models for Kimber and Smith & Wesson 1911’s, GLOCK Full-Size & Compact, and Springfield XD & XD(M) pistols. Based on our earlier experience with the Lightguard for 1911’s, we’ll bet it will fit the Springfield 1911 models as well. Also on the soon to hit the shelves list is the Rail Master unit with a green laser. We just finished reviewing a Rail Master with a light and found it to be versatile enough to fit every gun in our safe that is equipped with a rail. AR rifles included.

Crimson Trace Green Laserguard Specs

As stated, the Crimson Trace Green Laserguard will run for about 2 hours of continuous use. Considering that the unit is equipped with a positive on/off switch that disables the instinctive activation button, this is plenty. Going to an outdoor range to plink or practice? No problem, you decide if you want to chase the dot. If you would rather work with iron sights and save your battery, just flip the switch off and shoot normally.

Green laser vs red laser in daylight

Note how bright the Crimson Trace Green Laserguard is compared to a red laser in broad daylight

The Laserguard also features windage and elevation adjustments so you can set your laser zero to preference. When I mounted it on the Glock 17 Gen 4, the green dot was just above the front sight, so it had a usable zero right out of the box. The included tool is dual purpose. It fits the mounting screws that fasten the two halves of the Laserguard together and is used for windage and elevation adjustments.

The Crimson Trace Green Laserguard LG-452 uses a single CR2 Lithium battery. The first one is included with the unit. For future replacements, CR2 batteries are available at most any grocery or drug store,

The Living Daylights

The whole point of green lasers is visibility. The human eye picks up green easily – more so than other colors. In the same manner that human eyes are immediately drawn to members of the opposite sex, so it is with green lasers. It’s simple biology.

Installation of the Crimson Trace Green Lightguard LG-452 is easy

Installation of the Crimson Trace Green Laserguard is easy

The big benefit to the Crimson Trace Green Laserguard is high visibility – in all conditions. While operating indoors, the green laser really shines – noticeably more than a traditional red laser.

The biggest difference, however, is visibility in daylight conditions. I generally don’t bother trying to practice with a red laser at outdoor ranges unless it’s getting to be end of day and the light is fading significantly. You just can’t see that red laser dot more than a few feet away in direct sunlight. The green laser is an entirely different story. I had no problem clearly seeing the green dot, in broad daylight, on targets 100 feet or more away. It’s an amazing difference that you have to see to believe.

Our Review Rating

4 Nuns Four Nuns! Green lasers suck power like Rosie O’Donnell sucks at talk shows. But somehow, Crimson Trace has figured out how to pack 2 hours of super bright runtime into this small package. That’s plenty and batteries are cheap. We can’t wait to see what’s next…

 

Check out other My Gun Culture product reviews here!

Review: Are You Hung? I am.

I finally am.

And all for the low price of $19.95.

One of those neat inventions I found at the NRA Annual Meeting was Handgun Hangers by Gun Storage Solutions. These amazingly simple devices help make efficient use of the space in your gun safe while protecting your guns from gun-safe-bumper-car abuse.

As you can see from the photo, I had a problem. I was not hung. Knowing that you have a problem is the first step to recovery, so I stopped by the Gun Storage Solutions booth and boldy informed the young ladies working there that I had a problem. I was not hung, and I was miserable as a result.

safe-before-photo

After a quick diagnosis, the folks at Gun Storage Solutions offered a treatment regimen. And it didn’t even require little blue pills.

DSC_0001 (4)

The Original Handgun Hangers turned out to be my favorite. Simple to use, they allow you to hang handguns below virtually any shelf of normal thickness. Maybe an inch thick plus or minus. A ‘U’ shaped coated wire frame simply slips over the front edge of the shelf and a ‘U’ shape facing the other direction presents a coated road for the barrel to slip over – thereby hanging the gun. The coating protects the interior of the barrel.

DSC_0006 (3)

The Back Under Handgun Hangers slip over the back side of a shelf and allow long handguns like big revolvers to hang without the grip projecting past the front of the shelf as they would with the front mounted Original Handgun Hangers. This worked great for our Ruger Super Blackhawk and long barreled Ruger Single Six.

DSC_0002 (6)

This view shows the top side of the Over Under Handgun Hangers. A coated wire points up at about a 45 degree angle. It works pretty well for small profile handguns with reasonably short barrels. You can easily bend the angle of the coated wire up or down to create a better mount for specific guns.By the way, I can’t count. The Ruger LCR, second from the left, is simply resting between two others that are mounted using the system as I bought one pack too few of hangers. Unlike the folks at NBC who have no problem doctoring audio and video, I felt it only fair to include all the guns that were in the ‘before’ picture.

DSC_0003 (4)

Here’s the bottom of the Over Under Handgun Hangers. The bottom side works exactly like the Original Handgun Hangers. I found the Over Under hangers to be a bit wobbly. Make no mistake – the setup was still uber-better than the pile-o-guns I had before. Perhaps addition of a stabilizing bend on the bottom side like the one on the top side of the mount would improve the the situation.

Having tested most of the available configurations, my preference would be to do the whole setup with the Original Handgun Hangers. I would hang all pistols below the shelf and use the shelf tops for magazine storage as in the first picture.

All in all, hats off to the folks at Gun Storage Solutions for creating a simple and flexible system to organize your guns.

A side note – my particular safe has very little space between the inside main door panel and the front edges of the shelves. This means that I have not been able to find a inside-the-door handgun mount solution. The Handgun Hanger method overcomes that challenge.

It feels much better to be hung.

Coming Soon! Colt M2012 CR

Colt is showing a couple of prototypes of a very impressive bolt action rifle. The M2012 CR is a 13 pound, decked to the nines tactical and/or fun long range rifle.

The first versions should be out in a couple of months in .308. Short term plans include .223 and .22-250 chamberings – among others yet to be determined.

With 13 pounds of beef, this rifle should have virtually no recoil. Adjustable comb, 60 degree bolt, and a spiral-fluted barrel make it beastly looking and functional.

Estimated retail is about $3,700 give or take.

Can’t wait to shoot one…

The New SOG Light Saber? It’s ‘Glinty’

SHOT Show 2012 had more new things than we can ever cover, but this one stood out as awfully handy. And even more Star-Wars-y.

New this year from SOG are two new Blade Lights – offered in folding and fixed versions.

Pictured here is the folding version. It’s one of those oh-duh type devices offering a flashlight that works when the blade is open or closed, thereby letting one hand do the work of two. We can think of lot’s of practical uses:

  • Cleaning your fingernails in the middle of the night – without waking your significant other
  • Opening boxes in the dark
  • Checking to see if that London Broil on the grill is really done without admitting your lack of grill confidence to guests
  • And most importantly, making your fearsome knife blade actually ‘glint’ like they say in classic murder mysteries

The light is about 35 lumens and runs for nearly four and a half hours on AAA batteries.

Usually we might blow this off as a cheap gimmick. But coming from SOG, we’re confident that it’s built for punishment. And impressing your Navy Seal friends.

Shot Show Surprise – Slidefire

One of our Shot Show 2012 highlights was meeting the Slidefire crew and test firing their slick creations at Media Day.

The Slidefire system is essentially a stock / grip replacement that makes your semi-auto AR, AK-47, or AK-74 rifle act a whole lot like a full auto version of the same. User installable in minutes on the AR platform, slightly more difficult on AK’s, the Slidefire system requires no special permits, tax stamps, or groveling at the local Sheriffs office.

Technically speaking, you’re still only firing just one shot with each pull of the trigger with the Slidefire. The system simply uses recoil and creative design to help your finger pull the trigger really, really fast.

Look for more on this soon. We’re going to get our fingers on one and test it out in depth.

Ruger LCR .22

Checked out the new Ruger LCR .22 today.

Eight rounds of .22LR and the exact same feel as center fire LCR’s.

The only noticeable difference is that the trigger is heavier and has more stacking than the center fire version to account for the harder primer strike required on the .22 rim fire.

Gun Review: Glock 17 Generation 4 9mm Full Size Pistol

Approximate Street Price: $549.00

www.teamglock.com

The Good The Bad The Ugly Our Rating
The new grip texture is exceptionally effective. We really like it! We found the ejection pattern to be a little wonky and erratic with most types of ammunition. The VPC, CSGV and Brady folks still can’t claim that Glocks can pass through metal detectors. Truthfully anyway. 4 Nuns Four Nuns!

 

The Glock 17 Gen IV

The Glock 17 Gen IV

When the folks at Glock sent us a shiny new Glock 17 Generation IV to evaluate, we were obviously excited. After years of refinement, the Glock would now be able to pass through metal detectors and make true all those hysterical, pantie-wetting exaggerations we’ve been hearing for years. Right? Well, unfortunately no, but a lot of other enhancements have been made in the new models. Let’s take a closer look.

First Impressions of the Glock 17 Gen 4

  • Our G17 test gun came with three (17) round magazines. And a Glock magazine loader tool. We appreciate that as three magazines represents the minimum configuration for a self-defense gun. As a side note, we also really appreciate the street price of additional magazines for Glocks. $20-25 if you shop a bit. Compared to $40-50 magazines from other manufacturers who-will-not-be-named, that’s pretty darn reasonable.
  • Shooting it sideways did not make us look any more fearsome on the range. Nor did any Hollywood producers call offering us bad guy roles in new action films. We did get puzzled looks from other shooters at the range however – and one tried to sell us some crack.
  • The new G17 is a really comfortable gun to hold, and more importantly, shoot. It feels solid in the hand and has no tendency to slide around. No skateboard tape or rubber grip sleeves required, even if you’re a nervous sweaty-hand type.

Differences from Glock Generation 3 models

  • The Glock 17 magazine release is a subtle, yet effective change

    The Glock 17 magazine release is a subtle, yet effective change

    Magazine Release Button: It’s been embiggened, but in a really useful way. It’s got about twice the surface area of the previous design. We love the feel and ease of one-handed operation of the newly designed mag release. By the way, it’s also reversible so righties and lefties have an out-of-the-box solution. Very nice – a minor, but very noticeable enhancement.

  • Glock Gen III vs. Gen IV Grip Texture

    Glock Gen III vs. Gen IV Grip Texture

    Grip Texture: This is perhaps the most noticeable change from the Generation III models. The new pattern is the same on the sides, front, and back of the grip unlike the Gen III models which had a different pattern on the sides. The molded “skateboard tape” pattern on the sides of the Gen III grip never did much for us. Not enough grip. The Gen IV models use an entirely different pattern – raised dots that are completely separated from one another. We found this new pattern to be exceptionally effective for maintaining a solid grip – even here in the humid (and sweaty) lowcountry of South Carolina. The pattern almost feels rough and we had concerns that extended shooting would be tough on the hands, but it wasn’t. For that one person out there who still shoots with the support hand index finger on the front of the trigger guard, the new texture pattern there is comprised of a series of horizontal ridges. Just saying.

  • Recoil Spring Assembly: Like the Generation III models, the Gen IV features a captive recoil spring assembly that makes field stripping a little less embarrassing in the event you’re not paying attention to what you’re doing and let the spring fly. Unlike the Gen III models, the new Glock 17 utilizes a dual spring design. An inner full-length spring is partially surrounded by a metal sleeve, and both of those are surrounded by a partial length outer spring. According to Glock, the dual spring design not only reduces felt recoil, but increases the lifespan of the spring assembly. One item to note if you own or buy a Gen IV Glock 17: Glock has released several versions of the spring assembly and will supply customers with the most recent one if you call customer service at 877-745-8523. Have your model and serial number handy. Our test gun was fitted with an earlier model spring assembly version and the replacement set did not arrive in time for this review. However, we did not note any reliability or other problems, excepting the erratic ejection pattern discussed in this article. When the new assembly arrives, we’ll see if the ejection pattern issue changes and post and update if appropriate.
  • The new Glock Gen IV recoil spring assembly

    The new Glock Gen IV recoil spring assembly

    Modular Back Strap System: This is a fancy marketing term for ‘different grip sizes.’ We know this because we’re marketing people by trade and words like ‘modular’ are very much in vogue on Madison Avenue. Lot’s of current generation pistols offer this feature, but the Gen IV Glocks take a different, and we think better approach. The default grip is a solid, one-piece, molded assembly that’s ready to go out of the box. This default size is a tad (a tad is about .08 inches by the way) smaller than the Gen III Glock 17 in terms of distance to trigger. Adding on the included medium grip panel makes the Gen IV exactly equal to the standard Gen III in terms of trigger reach. The large grip panel makes it a tad bigger. The difference with the Glock approach is that the smallest setting is permanent – you simply add to additional panels to that to make the grip larger. Compare to a Beretta PX4 for example. On that pistol, the back of the grip is ‘empty’ and you insert one of three different size panels to size the grip. Not a huge deal, but I kind of like the idea of having a very solid and complete grip as a starting point from which to build. An interesting and efficient approach to the  problem of multiple grip sizes.

The Tactical Light Issue

We’ve had personal experience with older style Glock 22’s with mounted weapon lights. Utterly reliable without a mounted light, we’ve seen the same gun deteriorate to below average performance once a light was attached. According to X-Box geniuses with additional Mall Ninja certification, this had something to do with polymer frame flex characteristics on recoil. Whatever. In any case, we decided to give the Gen IV G17 a thorough workout with a Streamlight TLR-1 – the same light that has given us fits on older Glocks. Results? Awesome. We couldn’t make it fail. And we know a lot about failure. We shot an array of 115 grain and 124 grain high velocity self-defense ammo using a variety of grips (limp-sissy, medium, and strong) and function was flawless. Just for fun, we tried some ultra-light hand loads with the light mounted – 124 grain plated bullets loaded to about 1,050 feet per second. Again, function was flawless with weak and strong grips – even with ammo than can barely cycle the action.

Ejectile Dysfunction

Before our test model arrived, we had seen plenty of internet Couch Commando discussion about Gen IV Glocks having a tendency to eject brass straight back at the shooter. Other, apparently more knowledgeable, Recliner Rangers dismissed these observations as shooter error and ‘limp wristing.’ While we’re as limp wristed as the next guy, we decided to put this claim to the test. For starters, our model did have a bit of erratic ejection. With same bat grip and same bat ammo, ours would eject 80-90% of the brass out and back at about a 45 degree angle. No problem. The remainder did have a tendency to eject straight up. While they did not eject towards the face, they did on occasion land on top of our head. Good thing we’re not bald. We did a little experimentation on the Recliner Ranger limp wrist theory – shooting a series of rounds with a grip so solid that aim was impossible and another series with the most fairy-like hold we could muster – without getting beat up by other nearby shooters. Interestingly, there was no difference in the ejection pattern of significance. The solid grip did have a tendency to shift the pattern a little more to the side, but did not stop the occasional up and on-the-head brass fling. Our test gun came with an earlier version of the recoil spring assembly and when the newer recoil spring assembly arrives, we’ll run the test again – just for fun. In any case, this turned out to be a practical non-issue as no steaming hot brass hit us in the face. Internet myth in our opinion.

Relative Velocity

We thought it would be fun, and a great excuse to turn more money into noise, to see if the hexagonal rifling of the Glock 17 yielded any velocity difference one way or the other compared to something with similar barrel length and standard rifling – in this case a Beretta 92FS. While the Beretta has a potential velocity advantage with a 4.9″ barrel compared to the Glock’s 4.49″ barrel, we proceeded to try a few 9mm loads to see what happened. OK, we admit it, this test had no real practical or scientific value, but it did give us a great excuse to break out our Shooting Chrony Beta Master. Might as well share the results though:

Georgia Arms 124 grain Gold Dot
Glock 17: 1,235 fps
Beretta 92: 1,235 fps

124 Grain Berry’s Plated Handloads
Glock 17: 1,082 fps
Beretta 92: 1,082 fps

Interesting that the (non-scientific) results came in almost identical with the Glock having a half inch shorter barrel. Again, no real conclusions can be drawn, but this exercise did impress a number of novice shooters at the range today – and that’s gotta count for something.

Glock 17 Gen 4 Basic Stats:

  • Weight: 22.05 oz unloaded, 31.92 oz loaded
  • Length: 7.95″
  • Sight radius: 6.5″
  • Barrel length: 4.49″
  • Height: 5.43″
  • Width: 1.18″
  • Trigger pull weight: 5.5 lbs
  • Capacity: 17+1 rounds

 

He said She said
I really like this gun and don’t tell her, but I bought the evaluation sample. I hope to use it as my new Steel Challenge gun. One of the things I like about it is the crazy reliability. I like a gun that shoots equally well from any shooting position. As discussed in our review of the Glock 32, I tend to favor a gun that will still function and cycle no matter what type of grip I have. Just for fun, I tried this one with the most pathetic and lame grips imaginable and was unable to make it fail. That’s a good thing. I really like this one as well. Too big for most of my concealed carry needs though. Don’t tell him, but it’s going to become my new Steel Challenge gun! I really like the default (smallest) grip size. Gives me a perfect reach to the trigger with a natural grip. I also really like the default Glock sights. The “U” shaped rear sight with the white dot in front is really fast to pick up and great for Steel Challenge shooting. We’re reloaders and it would be nice to be able to shoot lead bullets as they are cheaper, but not a huge deal. I’ll just make him order plated bullets instead!

While you’re here, why not grab a copy of my free eBook, A Fistful of Shooting Tips? It’ll help make you a better handgun shooter and the envy of your range in no time!

 

Check out other My Gun Culture product reviews here!

 

Accessories available at Brownells


Find holster options in our new book, The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters – available at Amazon.com! Learn more about our Insanely Practical Guides!

Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters

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