Win A Year’s Worth of Free Ammo!

While the mystery of how the folks at LaserMax managed to find any ammo, much less a one year supply, continues to elude us, the story is true. They’re giving away 5,200 rounds of pistol ammunition. If you win, you get choice of caliber from the following:.22 LR, .380 ACP, 9mm, 38 SPL, .40 S&W, or .45 ACP.

LaserMax ammo giveaway

 

It’s easy to enter to win your one year supply of free ammo via one of three methods…

Method #1

Click here or scroll down to the bottom of this page, complete, and submit the online entry form. Online entries must be received between 12:00:01 AM Eastern Time (“ET”) on Monday, March 10, 2014 and 11:59:59 PM ET on Friday, June 20, 2014 (the “Sweepstakes Entry Period”). Limit: One (1) online entry per email address per day.

Method #2

LaserMax “Spring Savings” Promotion participants will be automatically entered to win. For complete details about this promotion, visit the rebate promotion page.

Method #3

Mail a handwritten postcard, including your name, complete address, phone number and email address to: LaserMax Spring Sweepstakes, c/o LaserMax, Inc., 3495 Winton Place, Rochester, NY 14623. Each postcard must be mailed separately, must be postmarked during the Sweepstakes Entry Period and received no later than Friday, June 27, 2014. Photocopied, illegible, or mechanically reproduced entries are not eligible. LaserMax is not responsible for lost, late, damaged, misdirected or postage-due mailed entries.

That’t it! Good luck!

Finding Holsters For Light And Laser Equipped Handguns: The Impossible Dream?

Just a few holster options for light and laser equipped handguns.

Just a few holster options for light and laser equipped handguns.

If you’ve been around here before, you know I’m a big fan of lasers for home defense and carry guns. I’m also a fanatical, raving, and kind of creepy bit of a holster geek. But, until recently, I’ve been hard-pressed to equip all my carry guns with lights and/or lasers.

Finding holsters for light / laser carry guns can make you as frustrated as Mike Bloomberg at a Colorado recall rally.

Why? Finding holsters for laser-equipped guns has been quite the challenge. Of course I’m talking lights and lasers that are mounted up front, usually under the barrel. Lasergrip offerings from Crimson Trace and guide rod lasers from LaserMax can use standard holsters without modification.

There’s no blame in this. It’s simply a math problem.

Holster makes already have to account for 13,786,667.43 different models of handguns, with new shapes and sizes hitting the market hourly.Add a half-dozen laser companies to the mix, each offering several different models, and then what?

There are more possible gun / laser / holster combinations than the number of White House excuses for the Obamacare  performance. (Tweet This)

But hope glimmers on the horizon. Recently, I have working with some most excellent holster options for laser-equipped guns. Each of the manufacturers below make different products for different guns, so the examples here are just that – examples.

Oh, and if you’re a Crimson Trace user, check out their new holster guide. It’s updated constantly with new products from Galco, DeSantis, CrossBreed, Fobus, Blackhawk!, Mitch Rosen, Blade-Tech and more.

CrossBreed SnapSlide

The SnapSlide is a great solution for this Springfield Armory XD-S with Crimson Trace Laserguard.

The SnapSlide is a great solution for this Springfield Armory XD-S with Crimson Trace Laserguard.

I’ve been testing one for the Springfield Armory XD-S equipped with a Crimson Trace LG-469 Laserguard and I find it neat-o. The belt loops are spread apart enough to offer great stability. The Kydex holster shell keeps the whole thing slim, which aids concealment. The best part? The rig is designed to ride very high so it’s much easier to conceal with a shirt or jacket that most other outside the waistband holsters.

Check the CrossBreed website for all available light / laser options.

DeSantis Speed Scabbard

An open top design, The DeSantis Speed Scabbard is all-leather holster is made for a number of light / laser options like the Crimson Trace Lightguard or Laserguard for Glocks.

I really like the holster. It’s an outside the waistband model without a rigid mouth. I don’t have trouble re-holstering it as the leather is sturdy enough to keep the mouth open. It shapes well to the body and offers great gun security – in fact you’ll want to break it in to smooth out the draw.

I used one at the 2013 Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational with a Glock 17, Crimson Trace Lasergrips and a Crimson Trace Lightguard.

Galco Meridian Concealed Carry Purse (or most other models)

Ladies, this one is specifically for you. If you choose to carry in your purse, be sure to do it safely.

Don’t let your gun flop around in a main purse compartment along with all sorts of other daily paraphernalia. (Tweet This)

That’s asking for trouble. Not only will it be hard to find your gun during an emergency, you run the risk of something getting caught up in the trigger – with potentially disastrous consequences.

Got a laser on your Smith & Wesson Shield? No problem!

Got a laser on your Smith & Wesson Shield? No problem!

If you choose purse carry, be sure to keep your gun in a dedicated compartment. That’s where a quality holster handbag like the Galco Meridian shines.

The Meridian is a fine-looking and functional handbag with a magnetically closing outside compartment, main interior compartment and separate interior compartment. Most importantly, it features a dedicated gun holster compartment accessible via a lockable vertical zipper on the exterior. Inside this compartment is a sewn-in holster pouch with a Velcro retention strap which can be removed if you prefer. We found that the retention strap is unnecessary with the medium size guns in this purse – it will stay in the holster pocket just fine.

The Galco Meridian is available in black or chocolate-brown. Galco makes a variety of styles with similar concealed carry functionality.

Comp-Tac MERC

Comp-Tac makes an excellent and insanely adjustable hybrid holster. That means it has a large leather back for stability and comfort and a Kydex molded gun pocket.

Now, Comp-Tac offers their MERC holster - MERC stands for Most Economical, Reliable, Comfortable by the way – in models ready to go for mounted lasers and lights. The list of supported models will almost certainly change, but at time of publication, Comp-Tac offers Crimson Trace and LaserMax for guns including the Springfield Armory XD-S, Smith & Wesson Shield and Kahr P9. One of the neat-o things about the Comp-Tac offerings is the flexibility. Everything is adjustable including retention, depth, cant and even the color of the belt clips to help it blend in to your existing wardrobe. Check out the Comp-Tac web site for more information.

Galco Stow-N-Go

The Galco Stow-N-Go is intended for simple, deep concealment. It features an open-top design for quick access, a reinforced mouth for one-handed reholstering and open bottoms to let dirt fall out. A vertical orientation allows for different carry options. You can use it behind the hip bone or in an appendix position. The exterior of the leather is a bit rough to help keep the holster in place via friction with your clothes.

CrossBreed SuperTuck

I love the hybrid inside the waistband holster design. The big leather backing provides comfort and stability, while the kydex gun pouch offers great security without adding thickness to the holster. Now that CrossBreed is making models compatible with Crimson Trace Lightguard and Laserguards, you can easily carry a pistol equipped with both laser and light. It’s a great solution.

N82 Tactical

The N82 holsters have some interesting innovations.

Spurred on to entrepreneurial enterprise by the belief that holsters should be both comfortable and comforting, the dynamic Nate duo and a rental squad of Oompa Loompas created a basic design that makes for an inherently wearable, yet solid and secure inside the waistband holster.
N82 Tactical Original Models allow lots of inside the waistband options for laser and light equipped guns.

N82 Tactical Original Models allow lots of inside the waistband options for laser and light equipped guns.

The N82 is a multi-layer affair. A large backing panel goes between the gun and your tender midsection skin areas. The panel is large enough to completely cover the gun and all or most of the grip — depending on the specific model. This keeps sharp and abrasive metal and wood stuff away from your belly. A belt clip is affixed to the gun pocket so the whole mess is tucked inside the waistband with the clip securing to your belt. Pretty simple.

Here’s where the layering comes in.

The body side of the panel is made from soft suede. N82 Tactical chose suede for several reasons. It’s a natural material, so it allows your skin to breathe and feel cool — even in hot and humid climates. Another reason for the suede lining is that it has a friction coefficient. Yeah, I told you we wouldn’t get into quantum physics and material dynamics in this book, but hang in there for a second. Since the whole suede area has some “grip” it serves to spread the weight of the gun over a broader area. Not that we’re calling your area broad or anything. OK, enough of the fancy science.

Sandwiched in the middle is a layer of neoprene. If you saw the movie Jaws, or have been to Sea World, you’ll know that this is the stuff that diver’s wetsuits are made of. It’s waterproof. While you probably won’t be diving with your N82 Tactical holster, the neoprene barrier does in fact create a moisture barrier between your sweaty broad area and your expensive gun. Even if you sweat, your gun stays dry. Within reason of course. The other reason behind the neoprene moisture barrier is to prevent the leather portion of the holster from becoming mushier and mushier over time. Three out of four Nate’s believe that leather doesn’t ever stop breaking in. It continues to get softer and softer over time, especially with exposure to moisture. We’re not sure what doctors and dentists believe.

The outer layer is leather. This provides structure and stability and a safe backing for your gun whether it be steel or polymer.

The original model, or Standard Series, utilizes a stretchy material to secure the gun to the leather holster panel. N82 got a lot of feedback from law enforcement customers that they loved the comfort of the tuckable design with its stretch band holster pocket, but needed additional positive retention for more active situations. Like the ones you see on every episode of CSI Las Vegas.

N82 makes a the original series holster for a number of guns with trigger guard lasers. When you go to order one for your specific gun, you’ll see laser options if available for that model. I’ve used one with a Springfield Armory XD-S and Crimson Trace LG-469 Laserguard with great success.

Recluse

Here’s a new, and patented, design worth a look. There are two basic models of the Recluse Holster. The OS models are open-sided while the TS models, as you can probably guess, are two-sided. The common element between the designs is the forward-facing solid leather flap that entirely hides the outline of your pocket gun.

The OS models feature a concealment panel on the outside. This completely breaks up the outline of the gun. The inside half of the holster is technically, kinda-sorta open. That’s where the patent comes in to play. Affixed to the leather holster is a molded plastic trigger block. This block is shaped to match the inside of the trigger guard of a specific gun. Molded into the block is a cutout that exactly matches the profile of the trigger.
To holster your gun, insert the muzzle into the bottom pouch, then shift the gun sideways so that the trigger block moves into position and the trigger is locked exactly in place per the trigger cutout. Once in place, the trigger is protected and secure.

To draw, you insert your fingers between your gun and the solid front panel to achieve a firing grip. The gun will come away from the trigger block sideways and can be withdrawn from your pocket.

The TS model is a little different. Rather than relying on a trigger block, this model features an interior leather panel. The interior leather flap is only attached at the bottom of the holster. To draw your gun, you shove your fingers between the leather flap and the gun, thereby creating space for a solid grip.

When you order direct from Recluse, you’ll see laser options on the product page where available.

I’m just scratching the surface here – and that’s a good thing. The holster market is exploding with options for lights and lasers on concealed carry guns.

Win This LaserMax UNI-MAX ES Rifle Value Pack

Tis’ the season for giving right?

Win this LaserMax UNI-MAX ES Rifle Value Pack laser

Win this LaserMax UNI-MAX ES Rifle Value Pack laser

Thanks to the nice folks at LaserMax, we’re going to give away a LaserMax UNI-MAX ES Rifle Value Pack to one of our lucky Facebook fans. That’s right, just head over to our Facebook page to enter, or you can do it directly from here. That’s all there is to it.

Keeping with our Insanely Practical philosophy, there are no strings attached. All you have to do is Like our Facebook page. The contest entry asks for your email, but that’s only for notifying the winner. We won’t even add you to our mailing list if you enter. Of course, if you would like to get our weekly email, packed with tips, product reviews and fun commentary on all things shooting, you can do that here.

This is an awesome addition to your AR-15 rifle, or any other rifle that has a rail up front. Heck, since it’s modular, you can even mount it on a pistol. We reviewed the LaserMax UNI-MAX ES recently if you want full details.

Enter here!

Do You Like It Flat? Your AR-15 That Is…

The LaserMax Uni-Max ES offers a very low profile option for your AR-15. Mount it on the top, side or bottom.

The LaserMax Uni-Max ES offers a very low profile option for your AR-15. Mount it on the top, side or bottom.

Do you like it flat?

Meaning the front of your AR rifle? Perhaps you don’t want a vertical fore grip laser and light assembly up front. If you frequently shoot at longer ranges, from sandbags or perhaps from a prone position, a vertical grip can get in the way. If you still want a laser attachment, there’s a great alternative that won’t get in the way of that nice, clean front hand guard.

The LaserMax Uni-Max ES is technically a multi-purpose product – it can switch teams with only a little bit on tinkering. Through a little rearranging of internal (and included) parts, you can convert this from a rifle laser with a remote activation pad to a pistol rail-mounted laser.

For pistols, you install the toggle switch that enables laser on / laser off from either side. With a rifle installation, you can certainly use the toggle switch if you like, but the momentary activation switch option is even better. This is a remote pressure pad which turns the laser on as long as you squeeze it. With judicious placement of the pad according to your personal preference, it’s a very natural motion to turn the laser on and off as desired. Just to be clear, while you can reconfigure this laser, it’s not something you would want to do daily as it will take you five minutes or so. The purpose is to give you flexibility over time to move between different guns.

Let’s talk about that “flat” configuration. The laser unit itself only extends 1/2 inch from a standard picatinny rail. So even if you mount it on the bottom of your rifle hand guard, as shown here, it hardly extends downward at all. Of course, if you want zero footprint, you can mount it on either side of the barrel and keep the bottom rail completely clean.

Here’s what I prefer. I mounted the laser unit on the bottom rail so that there are no “side to side” issues between the laser dot and point of impact. On the Daniel Defense rifle shown here, the laser and bore are only about 1 1/4 inches apart, so it’s not a big deal either way. I’m just being picky. All I have to worry about is an elevation difference of just over an inch between the laser and the point of impact at short distances. That’s nuthin’ right?

I chose to mount the momentary activation pressure pad on the right side so my natural grip was right on it.

I chose to mount the momentary activation pressure pad on the right side so my natural grip was right on it.

I chose to mount the momentary activation switch pressure pad on the right side of the hand guard. I’m right-handed, so my left hand is up front. Holding the hand guard from underneath, my fingers are used to press the pressure pad. I find it to be a very natural position. Squeeze a little tighter and the laser comes on. Release a bit of pressure and the laser goes off.

LaserMax includes a MantaRail cover with the Uni-Max ES, which is 2 3/4 inch section of textured rubber rail cover with an internal slot for the cord connecting the laser unit and momentary activation switch. So the cord comes out of the laser on the bottom rail, feeds underneath the rubber MantaRail cover and bends up to the side mounted momentary activation pad. All in all, there are only two one-inch sections of cord exposed, so there aren’t loose wires hanging around to get caught up on stuff. A side benefit of the MantaRail placement on the bottom rail is that it provides a grippy and comfortable rail cover where you hand goes. Nice touch.

A view from the bottom. Note the MantaRail cover just behind the laser. It secures the cord and makes a great hand grip.

A view from the bottom. Note the MantaRail cover just behind the laser. It secures the cord and makes a great hand grip.

The laser body itself also has a single-slot picatinny rail section on the bottom, so you can hang something else, like a light, just below the laser if you like. The laser unit is small and light, weighing just 2.5 ounces, so there is virtually no bulk up front on your rifle. It’s powered by two Silver Oxide 357 batteries and will run continuously for about an hour and a half.

I’m digging the LaserMax Uni-Max ES setup on a Daniel Defense DDM4V5 300 AAC Blackout rifle. A traditional optic is up top for longer ranges. I have the laser zeroed for 10 yards, but shorter and longer distances work just fine as the laser is so close to the bore line. So, in one package, you can have it all. A laser for home defense (or perhaps night hog hunting use) that’s preset for shorter distances and optics for reaching out.

The best part? Your laser configuration is pretty much out of the way when you want to use the rifle outdoors.

Vanquest MOLLE Sticks: They Will Save Your Sanity

At a recent Gunsite event hosted by my friends at LaserMax, I met Alex. He’s a gear head from Vanquest. But he doesn’t have greasy fingernails or smell like brake fluid, because his gear specialty is packs, bags, totes, backpacks and cases of all sorts.

Anyway, Alex showed me a sooper-dooper nifty little invention that it sure to save your sanity: MOLLE Sticks.

Two five-inch MOLLE Sticks. Shown here not hooking anything up so you can actually see them.

Two five-inch MOLLE Sticks. Shown here not hooking anything up so you can actually see them.

If you own a bag with all sorts of canvas straps all over it, it’s most likely MOLLE compatible. I’m pretty sure MOLLE stands for Militaristic Odor-eaters for Linsday Lohan Lawn tractor Excursions.

Or maybe it’s MOdular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment. You see, as cool as they are, our military Department of Namers-of-things always cheats on acronyms. There’s no “O” word in there, they just shamelessly borrow the one in “modular.”

Anyway, if you have a backpack, briefcase, camera bag, medical kit, bug out bag or MK-19 Automatic Grenade Launcher case with all these MOLLE straps, then maybe you’ve tried to hook some other pouch, canteen or perhaps a stuffed lemming to your bag. If you have, then you know it’s more annoying than all those home-made cartoons popping up all over Facebook.

Enter the sticks.

As opposed to a canvas strap that you have to wind through all those MOLLE loops, when there is no space whatsoever between the two surfaces, the MOLLE Sticks are made from slippery polymer. You simply push them through, in and out of the loops. When you hit the end, just push down the snap on the end to lock the stick in place.

Here I've used two MOLLE sticks to attach a Vanquest ISOPOD fold up pouch to my Vanquest Javelin VSlinger pack. Two other MOLLE sticks are shown beside.

Here I’ve used two MOLLE sticks to attach a Vanquest ISOPOD fold up pouch to my Vanquest Javelin VSlinger pack. Two other MOLLE sticks are shown beside.

It’s crazy easy to attach your MOLLE gear however you want – no matter how tight the loops are. And with these, the tighter the better, so your gear doesn’t jingle around.

The even better part is the instant removal. Whatever your reasons – simple pack reconfiguration, or maybe something really important like removing a modular medical kit – just unsnap the MOLLE Stick and it slides right out. The gear can be removed instantly.

Love, love, love these. You can get them from Vanquest here.

You don’t have to thank me, just consider this tip one of the many free benefits of Obamacare.

By the way, the pack and pouch shown here are two other nifty Vanquest products – the Vanquest Javelin VSlinger pack and the Vanquest ISOPOD fold up pouch. We’ll be reviewing those over at Bearing Arms.

Why Green Lasers Aren’t Green – New Native Green Technology from LaserMax

While at a LaserMax media event, I learned a lot about lasers. Like most everything else with a battery or plug, the technology is evolving at a dizzying rate. One of the things I learned was that green lasers aren’t green. Actually, they’re invisible (to the human eye) as they are derived from infrared light.

The LaserMax Native Green UNI-MAX (top) is noticeably brighter than traditional DPSS green laser light (bottom)

The LaserMax Native Green UNI-MAX (top) is noticeably brighter than traditional DPSS green laser light (bottom)

Allow me to explain. To produce green laser light, you need to shoot an infrared laser beam through some seriously mysterious conversion crystals. It’s a process called diode pumped solid-state technology or DPSS for short. The invisible infrared light goes in one end of the crystals and comes out the other side green. It’s a process called “magic.” Make sense?

While DPSS works, and does produce bright and easy-to-see green light, there are some drawbacks.

The Native Green Laser dot (left) and traditional green laser (right)

The Native Green Laser dot (left) and traditional green laser (right)

First, those magic crystals add bulk and weight. Not much, but when you’re trying to build a laser device small enough to work on a gun, every little bit counts. Think about those Ghostbusters Proton Packs. While not technically lasers, they generated some awesome light shows, but required a full-sized backpack particle accelerator. That would never be practical on a carry pistol as concealment would require a cover garment the size of a Volkswagen Beetle.

The other consideration is efficiency of the DPSS system itself. At high and low temperature extremes, the conversion process starts to break down and the light becomes less effective. For example, standard DPSS lasers (which use the crystal conversion process) operate beautifully at temperatures between 40 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Those temperatures don’t cover the full range or normal field environments. Any area north of the Florida border is likely to experience near freezing temperatures for a large part of the year. And while 100 degrees sounds like a reasonable top end, think of our men and women deployed in sandboxes around the world, where temperatures reach 120 degrees. Or, consider interior environments like those spooky shipping containers and warehouses prevalent on TV crime dramas. Those non-air-conditioned places get insanely hot in the summer, right?

Native Green lasers generate green light right off the bat using a green laser diode. With a native green light source, there is no need for the extra bulk of crystals to convert the light beam to green. Additionally, the effective temperature operating boundaries are extended. For example, a Native Green laser retains operating efficiency all the way down to 15 degrees Fahrenheit. At the high-end, they continue to generate bright green light up to about 150 degrees.

Read the rest at Outdoorhub.com!

Shooting Gelatinous Pig Juice With Mike McNett Of DoubleTap Ammunition

The slimiest part of our agenda at the recent Gunsite Academy event hosted by LaserMax was a ballistic testing demonstration by Mike McNett, founder of DoubleTap Ammunition.

Mike brought along some standardized 14 inch long gelatin blocks for destruction testing with a variety of DoubleTap loads, most of which use the Barnes TAC-XP all copper projectiles. I’ve had really good experience with these in my own testing. They expand reliably, and being solid copper, they don’t come apart when passing through barriers.

Mike arranges two 14 inch blocks end to end. As you'll see, some of the loads penetrated well into the second block.

Mike arranges two 14 inch blocks end to end. As you’ll see, some of the loads penetrated well into the second block.

First up on the agenda was a 10mm load using the Barnes TAC-XP bullet. The 125 grain projectile hums along at 1,600 feet per second out of a five-inch pistol barrel.

The DoubleTap 10mm TAC-XP load uses a light for caliber 160 grain projectile.

The DoubleTap 10mm TAC-XP load uses a light for caliber 125 grain projectile.

As you can see, penetration is excellent, even with the 125 grain bullet. The TAC-XP passed completely through the first 14 inch block, bounced against the second and fell to the table between the two.

Penetration of the 125 grain 10mm load was exactly 14 inches.

Penetration of the 125 grain 10mm load was exactly 14 inches.

After starting off with a bang, we moved to the other end of the spectrum and shot a .380 ACP loaded with a Bonded Defense projectile. DoubleTap uses Speer Gold Dot projectiles in their Bonded Defense line, so you can expect great expansion performance and no bullet jacket separation issues.

The 90 grain Bonded Defense .380 ACP bullet performed as advertised.

The 90 grain Bonded Defense .380 ACP bullet performed as advertised.

One of the more unusual rounds tested was the DoubleTap 9m+P Equalizer. This round features a total projectile weight of 165 grains, but is comprised of two distinct bullets – a jacketed hollow point designed to expand at lower velocities and a solid wadcutter with sharp edges. The hollow point is stacked on the top in front of the wadcutter, so both fire at the same time. From a range of about 20 feet, both projectiles hit the gelatin block within an inch of each other. Once in the gel, they followed completely separate tracks with the jacketed bullet traveling about 22 inches (it didn’t expand) and the wadcutter penetrating about 10 inches.

The ultimate DoubleTap? Two projectiles with each shot of this 9mm +P load.

The ultimate DoubleTap? Two projectiles with each shot of this 9mm +P load.

DoubleTap likes to use Barnes TAC-XP projectiles in many of its products for good reason. The solid copper projectiles penetrate deeply without fragmenting and deliver great expansion results, even after passing through barriers. The 110 grain .38 Special +P load still achieves over 1,100 feet per second velocity from the shortest barrel snub-nose revolver.

This .38 Special +P load was comfortable to shoot from a snubby, yet delivered excellent penetration and expansion.

This .38 Special +P load was comfortable to shoot from a snubby, yet delivered excellent penetration and expansion.

Another less traditional load tested was the “Mann” load named after Richard Mann. A standard pressure .45 ACP load, it uses a 160 grain Barnes TAC-XP bullet that exceeds 1,000 feet per second from a Government model 1911.

The Mann .45 ACP load penetrated almost 16 inches into ballistic gelatin.

The Mann .45 ACP load penetrated almost 16 inches into ballistic gelatin.

Velocity rules with hollow point projectiles. A .40 S&W 155 grain Bonded Defense load achieved absolute maximum expansion with velocity over 1,200 feet per second.

Bullets don't expand much more than this DoubleTap .40 S&W 155 grain Bonded Defense offering.

Bullets don’t expand much more than this DoubleTap .40 S&W 155 grain Bonded Defense offering.

To finish things up, we talked Gunsite Range Master Ed Head into launching a beast of a .500 S&W DoubleTap load at the pig juice. The 275 grain Barnes TAC-XP bullet hit at somewhere in the 1,600 feet per second range and literally knocked the first gelatin block into the air. When Ed regained feeling in his hands, we measured final penetration right at 20 inches. Yes, it was dramatic.

A 275 grain .500 S&W monster. I think it expanded to a diameter of about three and a half feet.

A 275 grain .500 S&W monster. I think it expanded to a diameter of about three and a half feet.

Not exactly a pocket gun solution...

Not exactly a pocket gun solution…

You can find more information at DoubleTap’s website.

Lessons From The Playhouse: A LaserMax And Gunsite Adventure

What can you learn from a playhouse? Life-saving tips, actually.

Step 1 of the house clearing exercise - opening the door. The Glock is equipped with a Simunitions conversion and the new LaserMax Native Green laser.

Step 1 of the house clearing exercise – opening the door. The Glock is equipped with a Simunitions conversion and the new LaserMax Native Green laser.

I just returned from a few days at Gunsite Academy – one of the nations premier shooting academies located just outside of Prescott, Arizona. That’s pronounced more like “biscuit” by the way, not “Scott.” You may also know of Prescott as Sturm, Ruger and Company builds most of their pistols there. It’s a gun friendly place to say the least.

I ended up at Gunsite thanks to the good folks at LaserMax. They’ve got some big news that will ripple through the laser sighting industry over the next couple of years – Native Green technology. We’ll talk more about that next week when I write a separate article on Native Green laser technology. For now, just be aware that green laser light is currently generated by shooting an infrared laser through some ‘magic’ crystals to “create” green light. Native Green lasers generate bright green light right off the bat with no conversion required.

Chris is not telling me how awesomely tactical I am. He's telling me to stop "water skiing" and that I just shot the bad guy in the hand.

Chris is not telling me how awesomely tactical I am. He’s telling me to stop “water skiing” and that I just shot the bad guy in the hand.

The LaserMax team enlisted the Gunsite staff to help us test out the new LaserMax Native Green lasers in a variety of scenarios, one of which was clearing the famous Gunsite Playhouse. The Playhouse is a specially constructed building designed to simulate a home or business with multiple rooms, hallways and hidden corners and nooks. In other words, it has lots of places for innocent bystander and bad guy targets to hide. The Playhouse is set up to handle either live fire from real guns or Simunitions marking projectile rounds. We used Glocks configured with Simunitions conversions so we could easily see hits. Using Simunitions in the Playhouse also allowed us to take pictures from a catwalk above during the exercises without risk of losing photographers to friendly fire.

I’m an experienced shooter and have taken a number of self-defense shooting classes. One predictable outcome from every training experience is that there are always leaning epiphanies. This time was no different.

First, I must stress how much our Gunsite Rangemasters, Mike Moore and Chris Weare, emphasized that you never, ever, ever, ever want to clear a house on your own. It’s a bad tactic and you’re at a major disadvantage from the start. The purpose of this drill was to learn some basic clearing techniques in the event you had to “clear” a building in order to get out of it, or perhaps reach a loved one in trouble. If you ever arrive at your home or business and see signs that there’s been a break in, back up and call 911. Don’t go in on your own.

We were given minimum instructions: open the front door and “deal” with things. That’s it. At the end of my three or four minute house clearing, I thought about what went right and what went wrong.

Read the rest at OutdoorHub.com!

LaserMax Ends The Rodent Chronicles Arms Race?

If you’ve been around here a while, you might remember a little incident involving wetlands, a raised home and a rat.

It all started when a hot-shot realtor, wearing capri pants, sold us a home surrounded by “wetlands.” You see, “wetlands” is realtor-code for “swamp.” And where there’s swamp, there’s rodents. Some, like deer and the occasional fox are fun to have around. Others, like rats, just need to be shot.

It’s not as bad as it sounds though. Many “wetlands” homes are raised, meaning the first floor is actually one level up. This leaves a big open area underneath that most folks would consider a garage. We, who are in the know, call it a flood facilitation zone, as the next big tsunami will wash a few shrimp boats and mobile homes through there. Anyway, one of the benefits of raised homes is that the swamp critters don’t have direct access to your living quarters, but they do on occasion invite themselves into your garage area.

The problem is this. Normal Ruger 10/22 aiming is just fine with the standard iron sights, or maybe a low power optic. But as varmint squatters only appear in dark conditions, you can’t really see sight or optics. I’ve tried other strategies with mixed success. One plan was to flip on the lights and rely on a snap shot before that little beast of my burden could scurry back into his hole like the coward he is. That was great fun until I snap shot the gas line. $75, and a lame explanation to the gas repairman later, I decided to try something different. In my defense, the gas fixit guy did say he had seen weirder things, but he declined to specify.

The best solution seemed to be application of advanced technology, because even though I think rats might just have opposable thumbs, I’m pretty sure they can’t read instructions. That means advantage me in the arms race. As the rat extermination gun of choice is a Ruger 10/22, I ruled out a night vision scope as that would just look silly.

The LaserMax Ruger 10/22 Laser turns your rifle into the equivalent of an Abrams tank ballistic fire control system. Well, almost.

The LaserMax Ruger 10/22 Laser turns your rifle into the equivalent of an Abrams tank ballistic fire control system. Well, almost.

Enter the new LaserMax Ruger 10/22 laser.

This little rodent illumination gem changes the whole ball game. I can now lurk in the shadows and dot that little garage squatter at leisure.

Here’s how it works.

Installation is a snap. Just remove the barrel band and slide it on.

Installation is a snap. Just remove the barrel band and slide it on.

The LaserMax Ruger 10/22 Laser is designed to replace the existing barrel band on the 10/22. After removal of the factory barrel band, the LaserMax 10/22 assembly slides right on to the the stock fore end. Kind of like a tactical beanie. Insert the included battery and tighten a couple of screws and you’re good to go.

To activate the laser, simply press the side lever right to left, or left to right if you’re feeling particularly rebellious, and it will stay on until you un-depress the lever. The switch is perfectly placed for your support hand to activate and deactivate easily.

Next, making sure your rifle is really and truly unloaded (chamber too!) aim it at a safe backstop and see how that newly-minted laser dot lines up with your iron sights. Windage and elevation adjustments are sensitive and you won’t need to use more than 1/2 turn total. If you do, something’s wrong with your mounting job. Once at the range, you can tweak the laser alignment to your preference , but lining up at home with your iron sights will get you really, really close.

Battery is included and note the accessory rail - they're on both sides.

Battery is included and note the accessory rail – they’re on both sides.

One of the neat things about the mount is that the laser is positioned directly under the bore and not offset to one side or the other. Using a sophisticated measuring device known in engineering circles as a ruler, I estimate the laser is just about 5/8 of an inch below the bore. So you can align the laser parallel with the bore, knowing that your shot will hit 5/8″ above at closer distances, or you can zero point of impact at a desired distance. Your choice.

One other note about the mount. Short rails are on both sides so you can mount a sling swivel, light, or any other rail mounted accessory you like.

The LaserMax Ruger 10/22 Laser is available in a couple of ways. If you already have a Ruger 10/22 rifle, you can order one as an add-on accessory. Or, if you’re in the market for the world’s most useful .22 rifle, order one ready to go from a Ruger dealer.

All in all this is one nifty add-on for a Ruger 10/22. It adds virtually no weight or bulk, and won’t get in the way of daytime shooting with iron sights or a scope. But it sure adds a lot of fun.

Keeping the garage rodent free is no longer a challenge.

Boom.

 

On the Seventh Day of Christmas… Seven Lasers Aiming

musical-notes

On the seventh day of Christmas, I hope my true love gives to me…
Seven lasers aiming…

musical-notes

Lasers make a great addition to self defense firearms and even light armor defeating rockets. Try these for your Christmas wish list:

LG-850

Crimson Trace LG-850
Brand spanking new for the full size Glock Gen IV platform, this one is compatible with the Crimson Trace Lightguard as it features a rear activation button. Unlike the older models, it also features a master on-off switch.We’ve got one of these on the way for review and will post results soon!

X5L_MP_Store

Viridian Gen 2 Light & Laser
Been looking for a light / laser combo for the Beretta PX4 Storm. This just might be the ticket. 154 lumen light and green laser that can flash or remain constant.

CTC-SFL-100

Crimson Trace SFL-100 for M72 LAW Anti-Tank Weapon
We have it on good authority that Iain Harrisonand the rest of the Crimson Trace PR and Marketing team carry this big caliber combo for personal defense. Maybe you should consider an upgrade as well? It IS your life after all…One note of caution – there is some risk of over-penetration with the LAW, so remember, every anti-tank rocket you fire has a lawyer attached to it.

Uni-Green X200

Lasermax Uni-Max Green
Always liked the versatility of this one. Small and thin, use it alone or clamp a light on the bottom for a self-configured combo-unit.

MVF-515G_CLASSIC

Crimson Trace MVF-515G Modular Foregrip for AR Rifles
Somehow this seems like some form of ‘dual-wielding’ with lights and lasers – but without the X-Box. Gotta get the green laser option but it also comes in red.

LG-402M_GHOSTED_7

Crimson Trace LG-402M for Beretta 92/96/M9
The newer mil-spec version is far more weatherproofy and features a front activation switch. We always had trouble with side activation switches as some holsters would activate the laser. Some people were put off by the red death beam coming out the bottom of my jeans.

lg904_classic

Crimson Trace G10 Master Series for 1911’s
Made of tough G10 material, these grips not only look sharp, but are plenty durable. Love the Rosewood versions as well.

 

musical-notes

musical-notes

Six scales a weighing…
Five magnum things…
Four written words…
Three tactical pens…
Two shooting gloves
And a Smith and Wesson M and P

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