Man Cave Makeover or Dame Den Remodeling Sweepstakes from Crimson Trace

Man-Cave-Makeover-Sweepstakes Prize PackageI just got an email from Crimson Trace about their Man Cave Makeover Sweepstakes. No worries ladies, the mega-gear giveaway is equally useful for a Dame Den Remodeling.

Visit the Crimson Trace BookFaceBook page to enter. You can win…

Grand Prize (1)

(1) Grizzly™ 75 Custom Cooler with Crimson Trace® Logo
(1) Crimson Trace® CMR-205 Rail Master® Pro™
(1) Crimson Trace® Neon Sign
(1) Crimson Trace® Rubber Floor Mat
(1) Crimson Trace® Wall Clock
(1) Crimson Trace® “Speed of Light” Tin Sign
(1) Crimson Trace® “Where There’s Red” T-Shirt
(1) Crimson Trace® “Laser-Bones” Trucker’s Hat
(4) Crimson Trace® Stainless Mason Jars
(2) Crimson Trace® Stainless Coffee Tumblers
(1) CRKT® R.B.T.™ (Range Bag Tool)
(1) CRKT® Picatinny Tool™
(1) BLACKHAWK!® CQB Rigger’s Belt
(1) BLACKHAWK!® Universal Bedside Holster
(1) Tactical Tailor® Medium Range Bag
(1) Tactical Tailor® Universal Laser Holster

Approx. Value = $1500

Second Prize (4)

(1) Grizzly™ 16 Custom Cooler with Crimson Trace® Logo
(1) Crimson Trace® CMR-201 Rail Master®
(1) Crimson Trace® Wall Clock
(1) Crimson Trace® “Speed of Light” Tin Sign
(2) Crimson Trace® Stainless Mason Jars
(1) Crimson Trace® Stainless Coffee Tumbler
(1) BLACKHAWK!® CQB Rigger’s Belt
(1) BLACKHAWK!® Universal Bedside Holster
(1) BLACKHAWK!® Universal Laser Holster
(1) Tactical Tailor® Small Range Bag

Approx. Value = $500

Alien Gear’s IWB / OWB Modular Holster: The Cloak Tuck 2.0

This Cloak Tuck 2.0 model came configured as an IWB but included an OWB panel too (left)

This Cloak Tuck 2.0 model came configured as an IWB but included an OWB panel too (left)

In the holster market, newcomers are companies in the business for only a few decades. So I suppose Alien Gear, having been around just under two years, is a certified spring chicken.

The company has grown faster than the congressional benefits plan, and the reasons why must include the comfort and flexibility of their holster designs. I recently received an Alien Gear Cloak Tuck 2.0 IWB holster for a Smith & Wesson Shield 9mm equipped with a Crimson Trace Laserguard LG-489. The company also included the OWB panel, which allows this holster to be converted to a leather-backed outside the waistband model, but more on that later.

Modularity

The IWB Cloak Tuck 2.0 in use with standard belt clips.

The IWB Cloak Tuck 2.0 in use with standard belt clips.

To understand the rest of the description of Alien Gear holsters, you have to understand the modular design. Simply put, think of the concept as two interchangeable parts: the back panel and the holster shell. Backings are available in different materials and choice of inside or outside the waistband designs. Holster shells attach to the backings with four T nuts and are interchangeable with any backing.

The idea is, that like a good pair of leather upper boots that you can re-sole over time, you can use the backing you prefer, and swap out holster shells when you switch to a different gun.

With any given gun, you can also swap out backings. For example, this evaluation holster came to me configured as an inside the waistband model. However, also in the box was an outside the waistband backing. For OWB holsters, Alien Gear uses a leather panel equipped with four T nuts in the same pattern as the OWB designs, so the IWB gun shell can be attached in a similar fashion. Leather loops are attached to the backing for belt attachment.

The last function that the modular design handles is retention strength.The plastic gun shell screws to the backing through four rubber washers. Tightening or loosening the entire shell sets the level of friction retention you want.

Construction

The 2.0 model has a neoprene backing for moisture resistance and comfort.

The 2.0 model has a neoprene backing for moisture resistance and comfort.

The difference between the Cloak Tuck 2.0 and original Cloak Tuck models is the material used for the large back panel. The original Cloak Tuck uses a leather panel, while the new 2.0 version utilizes neoprene with a synthetic surface on the outside. The idea behind the new neoprene backing is that the entire backing will better shape to your body and create a waterproof barrier between the gun and your body.

The gun shell itself is molded from thick Kydex. The lower edges that surround the muzzle area are rounded part way over the muzzle area of the gun. This nice extra touch prevents sharp edges from your front sight, barrel or slide from wearing holes into your clothes. I also noticed that the company takes the extra time to polish all edges of the Kydex shell so there are no sharp or abrasive surfaces.

Attachment Options

Right to left: Standard belt clips, leather snap loop, C clip and J clip.

Right to left: Standard belt clips, leather snap loop, C clip and J clip.

The Alien Gear IWB holster comes with standard Kydex clips that loop over the top of the belt and catch the bottom of the belt. They’re tuckable and very secure, but you will see the front section of the clip lying on top of the belt.

If you want more concealment, Alien Gear offers a variety of optional clips:

C clips are also tuckable, but only hook on to the top and bottom of the belt, so only small nubs are visible at the top and bottom of the belt. It’s doubtful that anyone would notice them, especially if you’re wearing a black colored belt.

J clips hook on the bottom of the belt only. They even more discreet than the C clips, and quite a bit easier to mount on your belt.

Leather snap loops also offer touchable security, but you’ll see the leather strap on the front of the belt. On the plus side, the snaps allow you to take the holster on and off without threading your belt through the loops.

Other clip options include metal and brown colored clips to better match belt colors.

Holster Insurance

You gotta love the service attitude of most companies in the shooting industry, and Alien Gear is no different. When you buy an Alien Gear, you’ve got three levels of “holster insurance.”

You’ve got 30 days to break it in. If you decide you don’t like it, they’ll buy it back from you. Holsters definitely have a break in period as they shape to the gun, your body shape, and your movements. Most holsters will not be all that comfortable until you wear them a while, so I’m glad to see the Alien Gear folks give you some trial time.

The modular design of these holsters means that the gun pocket and back panel are independent parts. You can break in the body section and swap out the portion that holds your gun. Alien Gear will let you trade in the plastic shell portion for a different gun shape. If you upgrade from a .32 to a .45 or downgrade from a Desert Eagle to a Ruger LCP, you’re covered.

A lifetime warranty backs it all up. If you ever have a problem, give them a call to get it straightened out.

Closing Thoughts

While I’ve read about Alien Gear holsters and seen the catchy ads, I was still pleasantly surprised at the attention to detail in construction.

The modular features are interesting. Swapping out the back would certainly be feasible if, for example, you normally carried inside the waistband and wanted to do a quick conversation to OWB for a class or competition. It’s not something I would want to do daily, but for occasional use, it would make sense given that it only takes a few minutes to do the swap. The ability to trade gun pockets for no charge is also a nice feature for those wanting to upgrade to a different carry gun.

Check ‘em out to see what they’ve got for your carry gun.

More about holsters for concealed carry

If you want to learn a whole lot more about concealed carry holsters, methods of carry and pros and cons of different holster designs, check out our Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters book!

New Smith & Wesson M&P Laser from Crimson Trace

Crimson Trace LG-360

New from Crimson Trace is a green Laserguard for Smith & Wesson full-size and compact pistols. The new super-small LG-360G unit even features scalloped design to match the host gun’s slide serration pattern.

From the company:

Crimson Trace, America’s leading brand in laser sighting systems and tactical lights for firearms, will soon release the LG-360G –a new Laserguard® equipped with a powerful Crimson Trace green laser. This Laserguard is engineered to perfectly fit over the trigger guard and rail system of the popular S&W M&P full-size and compact pistols, and it features Crimson Trace’s Instinctive Activation™ with a pressure sensitive touch pad under the trigger guard. The new LG-360G will also provide the user with a master on/off switch to permit user preferences on when the laser can be engaged—or disengaged.

The Laserguard LG-360G features a unique set of inset scallops that match the in-the-metal patterns found along a portion of the pistol’s slide. Those scallops, along with seamless integration, combine to make the new LG-360G have a factory-built appeal and appearance. This new Laserguard will also permit windage and elevation adjustments that can be easily accomplished with the provided tools. This laser sight can be easily installed by the buyer in a few minutes without any special gunsmithing tools, and it will be covered under Crimson Trace’s popular Free Batteries for Life program.

The Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for the LG-360G will be $299.

Get Your Beam On! Black Friday Deals From Crimson Trace

1911 Master Series Lasergrip by Crimson Trace

1911 Master Series Lasergrip by Crimson Trace

If you have a gun for self and home defense, it ought to have a laser. It’s an extra tool that can make a huge difference in your ability to effectively use a gun, especially in low light conditions. Looks like Crimson Trace is offering some holiday deals…

Crimson Trace is offering discounts ranging from $20 to $50 off retail prices on products from Friday, November 28 through Thursday, December 25. The discount is determined by the product selected and is automatically applied during e-check out in the company’s online store.

Among the product lines that will be on sale only at www.crimsontrace.com are:

  • Master Series® laser sights which are designed for 1911 pistols and are available in multiple woods (from walnut to cocobolo) and in durable G-10.
  • Lasergrips® with Instinctive Activation™ and a master on/off switch.
  • Laserguard®, a laser sight that seamlessly attaches to the trigger guard on many popular pistol models. Many red or green laser Laserguard models are available.
  • Lightguard™ offers 100- or 130-lumen LED white lights and attaches to the trigger guard of numerous pistols.
  • Rail Master®, the compact red or green laser sights—or light— that can be attached to most rail-equipped firearms.
  • Rail Master Pros™, the small durable light and laser combination units that are machined from a solid block of aluminum. Each Rail Master Pro offers four operation modes: light, laser, light and laser and laser with disorienting strobe light.

Manufacturer Suggested Retail Prices of these products range from $129 up to $649. All Crimson Trace products are also designed to be easily installed by the user. For more details about Crimson Trace and its wide range of innovative laser sight and light products, visit www.crimsontrace.com or call the company’s customer service department at 800-442-2406.

Pic of the Day: Ankles of Doom

Galco Ankle Glove Ruger LCR 357 Hornady Critical Defense

My favorite ankle carry setup? That’s easy. It’s a combination of the Galco Ankle Glove ankle holster, Ruger LCR 357 and Hornady Critical Defense 357 Magnum ammo.

I like the ankle glove for a number of reasons. The band is neoprene lined inside with sheepskin, so it’s stable and comfortable – even in hot weather. The gun holster is made from sturdy leather and perfectly fit for specific guns. Best of all, the holster compartment is molded completely outside of the ankle band, so your gun doesn’t press into your leg. When I’m wearing boots, I use the Ankle Glove as is. When wearing lower cut shoes, I add the Galco Calf Strap to hold the rig higher on my leg, so it’s not visible.

The extra ammo is carried on a Bianchi Speed Strip, which holds six rounds flat, so they fit comfortably in your pants pocket. Speaking of ammo, I like the Hornady Critical Defense 357 Magnum round as its power factor is somewhere between .38 Special +P and a full-power .357 Magnum. You can actually shoot it from the Ruger LCR 357 with good control.

At some point, I’ll have to add the Crimson Trace Lasergrip to the Ruger LCR 357 to complete the package.

How To Build Your Own Lasergrips

The author looks confident, but only because Tong is really in charge.

The author looks confident, but only because Tong is really in charge.

I always thought I was pretty handy, at least until today. Then I got humbled.

You see, I had the opportunity to build my very own Crimson Trace LG-401G Lasergrips for a 1911 pistol. I was visiting the Crimson Trace factory in Wilsonville, Oregon, just south of Portland, and those crazy folks seemed to believe that even a klutz like me could make something high tech like a four milliwatt green instinctive activation pistol laser. But they didn’t have enough faith in my technical ability to turn me loose on the factory floor unsupervised.

Tong was the engineer who humbled me, but he was really nice about it. He let me make some mistakes, then gently corrected my little messes while teaching me the right way to do things. I actually worked with Tong on two sets of grips. He built the first set, while carefully instructing me on the intricacies of each step in the process, and there were a lot of them – 13,729 I think, but who’s counting? I then took the drivers seat and started on the Lasergrips that I would build, then take home with me, to install and use on one of my 1911s.

Making your own Lasergrips is easy. In fact, pretty much anyone can do it. Just assemble the following tools and facilities, then we’ll walk through the process together here. Go ahead, I’ll wait til you’re ready.

An armory

I’m assuming you have more than one gun, so you’ll need at least a dozen guns of each type for the laser you want to design and build. Some of them will be used for performance testing. You see, a laser has to be built to absorb massive g-forces of recoil in the x, y and z axis – tens of thousands of times. Oh, the grips and electronic components inside have to deal with rotational forces also. You’ll wear out a few guns until you get the laser and interior components design just right.

Some of the guns you’ll need to chop apart into pieces. This is the part where you and I both cry. Chop up perfectly good guns? Yep, it’s all for the cause. See, when you assemble the grips, you’ll want to do it on the actual gun frame you’re making the laser for, not a copy that might have slight dimensional variances. The best way, how Crimson Trace does it, is to chop off the grip end of the frame of an actual gun to make construction jigs. Of course you’ll need to make multiple sets of these so you can meet the required production volume.

An indoor shooting range

You’ll want to install an indoor shooting range, hire an armorer to keep all the guns in the armory running, then train staff members to perform the hundreds of thousands of rounds of live fire testing. Believe it or not, there will be too much shooting for just one person to handle. Don’t forget to install lead management ventilation systems – and soundproofing so you don’t tick off the neighbors.

An engineering testing lab

If you’re going to do it right, you need testing facilities in house for non-shooting performance testing. You’ll need electrical testing equipment to make sure your battery and power management designs are up to par. You’ll also need moisture and immersion testing equipment, because a laser on a gun wouldn’t be of much use if it stopped working when it got a little wet. Don’t forget environmental testing equipment. Your Lasergrips will need to perform in exceptional hot and cold conditions. Not only environmental temperature changes, but operational temperature changes. Guns get hot when you shoot them a lot.

A collimation lab

Direct green laser diodes are a raw material that need to be directed, tuned and tweaked before they’re capable of projecting a neat green dot on target. After you line up your German diode supplier, you’ll need to construct special housings and install the diodes in them so they don’t get smashed to bits by recoil. Oh, and you’ll need to design an adjustable lens that takes the broad, rectangular green light output of the diode and focuses it into a sharp dot at a range of 25 feet. For this application, you can do what Crimson Trace does and construct mirror mazes, so you can focus each and every diode in a smaller space because you’re bouncing the beam out and back via the mirrors. Distance is distance, regardless of how many turns there are.

Read the rest at OutdoorHub!

You Really, Really Want to Win This…

Gunsite Sweepstakes

So Crimson Trace is giving away an all expenses paid trip to the world famous Gunsite Academy to take the gold-standard of handgun training classes – Gunsite 250. But, this one has a twist. It’s the Laser Course, which adds practical use of laser sights.

At risk of reducing my own chances of winning, I’m sharing this information with you. Yes, I know, I’m such a giver…

The famous Gunsite Academy, based in Arizona, is known to many gun owners as a place to learn in-depth firearms shooting and handling skills. Now Crimson Trace, America’s leading developer and supplier of laser sighting systems and tactical lights, will be sending a grand prize winner and guest on a trip to Gunsite Academy. Those two shooters will be enrolled in the Crimson Trace Gunsite 250 Laser Course scheduled during November 3-7. This program will utilize the innovative 250 Course Doctrine—plus the practical use of laser sights on a firearm.

“The 250 Laser Course is an intense, one-of-a-kind experience for shooters,” said Gary Killingsworth, Crimson Trace Digital Marketing Manager. “Not only will they gain hands-on training from some of the best instructors in the business, they will learn the intricacies of shooting with both fixed sights and laser sights. We’re extremely proud of this partnership with Gunsite Academy, and pleased to be able to help offer this unique training opportunity.”

The contest winner— and guest—will have airfare, ground transportation, lodging and course registration fees provided. The deadline to enter the contest is September 30, 2014 and entrants must be U.S. citizens age 21—or older. Full contest details are at http://www.gunsite250lasersweepstakes.com.

Sig Sauer’s Single Action Sensation: The P226 Elite SAO

That's right, there's no decocking lever on this Sig P226!

That’s right, there’s no decocking lever on this Sig P226!

I like action. Who doesn’t?

Single action. Traditional double action. Double action only. Striker-fired action. I like ‘em all. But I especially like single action handguns. Having only one thing to do, release the hammer, single actions tend to be easier to shoot accurately. Repeatable accuracy leads to confidence, and confidence is something I want in spades if I’m carrying a gun for protection.

With that goal in mind – a carry gun that inspires confidence – I checked out the new Sig Sauer Elite SAO. Unlike most traditional Sig Sauer pistols, this one is a single action – kind of like a 1911. Its got an ambidextrous safety lever. You carry it cocked and locked. In fact, outside of cosmetic differences, one of the few

The safety levers on this model are ambidextrous and of equal size on both sides.

The safety levers on this model are ambidextrous and of equal size on both sides.

observable things different from a 1911 is that the Sig has a hinged trigger while the 1911’s trigger moves straight back like a sliding door.

OK, so that’s some gross over-simplification. The Sig P226 Elite SAO has classic Sig internals – not the hinged recoil action and barrel bushing we’re accustomed to seeing in a 1911. Yet it offers the benefits of a constant, light trigger to aid in accurate shooting. Unlike the 1911, it offers a double stack magazine so you get 15 rounds of ammo, plus an extra in the chamber. Oh yeah, and it’s chambered in 9mm, not .45 ACP.

I keep mentioning 1911’s as a comparison, but if you want to get more specific, you can think of the Sig P226 Elite SAO as a combat version of the P226 X-5 Competition. While the X-5 Competition models are built as elite pistols for professional competitors, they’re not necessarily suited for defensive or combat use. You’ll find allen screws all over the place on a competition X-5 model as the design allows specific adjustment to nearly every aspect of the gun’s operation. Trigger weight, trigger travel, trigger over travel, trigger shape, magazine well style, compensators, flux capacitors and so on. You can also find similarity with the P226 X-5 Tactical model, but the Elite SAO has a 4.4 inch barrel instead of 5 inches. Corresponding overall length dimensions are shorter and weight of the Elite SAO is about one ounce less.

Read the rest at GunsAmerica!

Thinking about getting a gun for personal or home defense? Or maybe for recreation or competition? Then you need to read this first!

Shooting the Beretta 1301 Tactical Shotgun in the Dark

The business end of the Beretta 1301 Tactical shotgun, shown here with a Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro light and laser and two-round magazine tube extension.

The business end of the Beretta 1301 Tactical shotgun, shown here with a Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro light and laser and two-round magazine tube extension.

Recently I wrote about my first experiences with the Beretta 1301 Tactical shotgun. I love the “shotgun carbine” idea of a short, light and handy defensive shotgun. What I didn’t get into before was the idea that if you ever had to use a defensive shotgun, it would probably be in the middle of the night, meaning in the dark.

I decided to take a shot at gearing up the Beretta 1301 for night time use and testing it in dark conditions. The perfect opportunity was the recent Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational competition. If you’re not familiar, it’s a three gun event with one important twist of the rules. The competition takes places in the middle of the desert outside of Bend, Oregon, but the shooting doesn’t start until after 9pm. If you haven’t been in the middle of the high desert in the middle of the night recently, I can tell you, it’s dark. Really dark. No residual light from nearby towns. No street lights. Heck, the range doesn’t even have electricity or running water. When the International Space Station passes overhead, they have to pause the match because of the glare.

Anyway, in preparation for my midnight rendezvous, I added some goodies to the Beretta 1301. 

First, I called the nice folks at Crimson Trace and politely explained to them that since I was risking life and limb to compete in this match, they should loan me a light or laser for the shotgun. They sent a Rail Master Pro, which offers both 100 lumen light and a red laser that activates with a simple paddle switch. You can configure the light and laser to operate in different modes – a strobe light, for example, but set mine up so that movement of the paddle would turn on both light and laser until i hit the paddle again to turn them off. I mounted this on the barrel with a Nordic Components magazine tube extension and barrel clamp with rail so that I could reach it with my support hand. As I’m right-handed, I put it on the right side of the barrel, so it’s out of the way of my support hand grip, but easily accessible with my support hand fingers when I want to flip it on.

Next, I called Kristi at Aimpoint. Like my Aimpoint PRO, Kristi has never let me down when it comes to good advice about optics. She loaned me an Aimpoint Micro H-1 optic. I guessed that it would line up perfectly with the iron sights on the. Beretta 1301 and it did. I could see the iron sights through the bottom half of the Aimpoint Micro. If my optic ever failed, then I would have a backup option of using the iron sights. This seemed like a good idea until Kristi reminded me that the whole deal about Aimpoint optics is that the batteries run 75% of forever. In this case, you can leave the Micro on for about 5 years non-stop. I figured I could remember to change batteries every couple of years or so to avoid any risk of downtime. 

Aimpoint_Micro_H1_Beretta_1301_Tactical-1

The Aimpoint Micro H1 mounted on the Beretta 1301 Tactical’s rail.

Now, when I turn out the lights, I have a compact shotgun with a forward-looking tactical light and I see two red dots out yonder – one from the laser and the other from the Aimpoint. 

For ammo, the choice was easy. I needed something reliable with shot size with a dense enough pattern to break stationary and flying clays at high speed, but with enough “oomph” to knock down steel targets with one shot. I chose Federal Premium Gold Medal Target loads with 7 1/2 shot

Read the rest at Beretta USA!

Be sure to check out Tom’s latest books! They are ON SALE now for a limited time!

Shooting In The Dark: Reports From The Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational

Everybody knows siblings shouldn't share toys! Here Lanny (left) and Tracy (right) are politely discussing who gets to use the Beretta 1301 Competition shotgun next.

Everybody knows siblings shouldn’t share toys! Here Lanny (left) and Tracy (right) are politely discussing who gets to use the Beretta 1301 Competition shotgun next.

As I write this, I’m coming down off a major high. I’m sitting on an airplane on the way back home from the high desert miles outside of the beautiful town of Bend, Oregon.

I’ve been out there all week at the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational competition. Like last year, the event was held at the COSSA range which is located miles and miles from nowhere. This works out pretty well as neighbors in more populated areas might get a bit upset about hearing gunfire all night long for four straight nights.

The event runs most of the week with two consecutive matches. Wednesday and Thursday, media members and the volunteer range officer staff shoot together. This allows the range staff to shoot the whole match, yet be available for dedicated range safety and logistics duties when the professionals shoot Friday and Saturday nights. All results from the two matches are consolidated into a single overall results tabulation, so everyone is eligible for the same prizes regardless of which nights they shoot.

As the name implies, shooting doesn’t even start until it’s fully dark. Competitors, range staff, media and visitors are all required to illuminate themselves with chemical glow sticks. One on the front and one on the back ensures that anyone still downrange from a target refresh will be clearly visible. As a result of the range staff’s care and attention to detail, the event boasts a perfect safety record.

Crimson_Trace_M3GI-32

Lanny Barnes blasts a clay target with her Beretta 1301 Competition. Or is that Tracy’s gun?

As a media hack, I shot the Wednesday and Thursday match. One of my goals was to really kick the tires of the Beretta 1301 Tactical shotgun I’ve been evaluating. In my next article, I’ll go into detail about how I configured it for nighttime use, but for now, I’ll note the following. I chose the Tactical version even though there is a 1301 Competition model that offers competitive tweaks like higher shell capacity and larger loading port. The environment was great for really exercising a defensive shotgun – dirty, dusty and dark. Three of us shared the Beretta 1301 Tactical as wanted to run as much ammo through it as possible during the match. Since receiving the gun, I haven’t cleaned it, nor did I do any maintenance during the match. No matter, it ran like a champ with zero malfunctions of any kind. The super compact design of this gun made shooting and moving very easy. I chose to run first rate shotshells through the gun as a prize table was on the line. I used Federal Premium Gold Medal Target loads with 7 1/2 shot. I could stuff seven shells into the magazine tube plus one more in the chamber. More importantly, the 1 1/8 ounce shot load knocked down steel with authority. The pattern from the Beretta 1301 Tactical’s cylinder bore was even and blew up the clay targets consistently.

One of the benefits of shooting the pre-match was that I could focus on following the big shots during the main match. Big shots like Tracy and Lanny Barnes. You know them, right? Yeah, they are (now retired) Olympic biathletes, so they know a thing or two about shooting under stress and conditioning. You might also recognize the name as Tracy is a writer right here at Beretta USA. Tracy and Lanny both used the Beretta 1301 Competition shotguns. I’m convinced that my deliberate choice to use the 1301 Tactical, with its lower shell capacity, is the only possible explanation for Tracy and Lanny blowing right past my scores in the first few minutes of the competition. But let’s move away from that topic. At least I got some great trigger time with my home defense gun.

Read the rest at Beretta USA!

 

Be sure to check out Tom’s latest books! They are ON SALE now for a limited time!

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