How To Install Flash Hiders Or Muzzle Brakes on the M1A or M14

One of the ongoing tinkering projects around here has been customization of a Springfield Armory M1A Standard, which we reviewed a while back. One of the first things done to this rifle was installation of a tritium sight post for low-light capability with the iron sights. We chose the Smith Enterprise Tritium Close Combat Sight (TCCS) and mounted that front sight assembly on the standard front sight dovetail.

So far so good!

I need (OK, want) to mount the Smith Enterprise Vortex and Good Iron Muzzle Brake on a standard M1A, but there are a few steps to complete first...

I need (OK, want) to mount the Smith Enterprise Vortex and Good Iron Muzzle Brake on a standard M1A, but there are a few steps to complete first…

But now it’s time to get crazy with flash suppressors and muzzle brakes. Yeah, I know, those are contradictory things, but as this is a tinkering project, we’re going to try both at different times and report on the results. We’re going to compare the Smith Enterprise M1A / M14 Direct Connect Vortex and the Smith Enterprise Good Iron Muzzle Brake. Not to each other, but to a factory standard configuration. Stay tuned for separate articles on how well they control flash and compensate for recoil compared to the default setup.

But, like many of those Saturday honey-do projects, this one also has somewhat of a domino effect. If you remove the standard flash hider from an M1A or M14, you lose the front sight dovetail. As I really like having iron sights on this rifle, it’s time to figure out how to keep a front iron sight while being able to swap out the standard flash hider with other options.

Enter the Smith Enterprise Gas Lock Front Sight.

Smith Enterprise offers a couple different options that allow installation of a front sight on top of the gas lock instead on top of the standard bird cage flash hider. For flexibility, we’re going to install the Smith Enterprise GLFS-D-22, which is designed for standard 22″ barrels. It’s really more of a front sight platform as it features standard male dovetail. This allows you to reinstall the factory front sight on top of the gas lock or use an upgraded version like the Smith Enterprise TCCS or match sight models.

Let’s get busy:

Before we can do anything with aftermarket flash hiders and muzzle brakes, we need to relocate the front sight back to the gas lock. This assumes you want to keep iron sights. If you don’t, you can just remove the default flash hider and not worry about the gas lock.

An easily overlooked step is removal of the retaining screw which prevent the castle nut from moving!

An easily overlooked step is removal of the retaining screw which prevents the castle nut from moving!

You’re going to want to remove the barreled action from the stock to make things a bit easier. It also helps to put the barrel in a padded vise, as the castle nut can be tight. You’ll need a pair of castle nut pliers which you can get at Brownells for about $15.

Use the castle nut pliers to loosen the nut. Looking from the breech end, the nut will turn clockwise.

Use the castle nut pliers to loosen the nut. Looking from the breech end, the nut will turn clockwise.

Once the bond is broken loose with the castle nut pliers, loosed the nut a little bit. Then slide the flash hider forward. Then loosen the nut some more. Then slide forward. And so on. Eventually it will come off.

Once the bond is broken loose with the castle nut pliers, loosen the nut a little bit. Then slide the flash hider forward. Then loosen the nut some more. Then slide forward. And so on. Eventually it will come off.

Voila!

Voila!

Since I’m going to keep my front sights, I need to move the base to the gas lock. Loosen the gas plug and remove it. This should be fairly easy. Remember, this is a dry area, so don’t slop gun oil all over it!

When you remove the gas plug, you can clean it off, but keep it oil-free.

When you remove the gas plug, you can clean it off, but keep it oil-free.

Now it’s time to remove the gas lock. This should also be fairly easy. Just unscrew it until it slides off the barrel.

Just unscrew the existing gas lock and remove.

Just unscrew the existing gas lock and remove.

Now just screw the Smith Enterprise Gas Lock Front Sight dovetail into place.

Now just screw the Smith Enterprise Gas Lock Front Sight dovetail into place.

When the new GLFS is lined up correctly, reinstall the gas plug.

When the new GLFS is lined up correctly, reinstall the gas plug.

Now, just mount your front sight on the new GLFS dovetail.

Now, just mount your front sight on the new GLFS dovetail.

Since you’ve moved the front sight post to a new base, you’ll need to head to the range and re-zero your rifle. Bummer, time to go shooting!

Job completed!

Job completed!

After relocating the front sight to the Smith Enterprise Gas Lock Front Sight dovetail, I reinstalled the standard flash hider, but only because I want to try to get some nifty before and after muzzle blast photos when we go to the next step – installing the Smith Enterprise Vortex Flash Hider.

Shooting At Night Photos From The Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational

The Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational was a dual purpose event. The first two nights provided shooting industry media an opportunity to shoot the match before the pro 3 Gunners arrived for the Friday and Saturday night competition. Sponsoring vendors also set up demonstrations at the range during daylight hours to test out some of their latest gear.

Here’s a look:

Why not hold a 3 Gun match in the middle of the night? It works for match sponsor Crimson Trace!

Why not hold a 3 Gun match in the middle of the night? It works for match sponsor Crimson Trace!

It looks so easy in the daytime, doesn't it?

It looks so easy in the daytime, doesn’t it?

These targets are about to get perforated by a full-auto FN SCAR.

These targets are about to get perforated by a full-auto FN SCAR.

Getting ready to shoot! Note the LED shoes!

Getting ready to shoot! Note the LED shoes!

A horde of targets...

A horde of targets…

The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range facility was fantastic.

The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range facility was fantastic.

The business end of a Colt Competition Rifle.

The business end of a Colt Competition Rifle.

Jawin' with Ryan from GunTalk Television.

Jawin’ with Ryan from GunTalk Television.

Colt Competition shooters providing some spotting assistance. Wyatt Gibson, with the binocs, toop top Junior honors.

Colt Competition shooters providing some spotting assistance. Wyatt Gibson, with the binocs, took top Junior honors.

Lot's of really sweet rifles were on hand at Media Range Day.

Lot’s of really sweet rifles were on hand at Media Range Day.

Will you see Ryan Gresham working the MGM spinner target on a future episode of GunTalk Television? I guess we'll see.

Will you see Ryan Gresham working the MGM spinner target on a future episode of GunTalk Television? I guess we’ll see.

Caleb Giddings and Chris Cerino in a little long-range snubby revolver shooting challenge.

Caleb Giddings and Chris Cerino in a little long-range snubby revolver shooting challenge.

Just a little bit of muzzle blast...

Just a little bit of muzzle blast…

Jerry Miculek waiting for the match to start.

Jerry Miculek waiting for the match to start.

The Nosler stage had a variety of short range targets and some long range rifle plates in the distance.

The Nosler stage had a variety of short-range targets and some long-range rifle plates in the distance.

Kay Miculek tries to break daughter Lena's concentration prior to the start...

Kay Miculek tries to break daughter Lena’s concentration prior to the start…

A good pre-match omen! The weather was perfect throughout.

A good pre-match omen! The weather was perfect throughout.

A pre-match stage briefing. No, it's not dark enough yet!

A pre-match stage briefing. No, it’s not dark enough yet!

Kind of creepy?

Kind of creepy?

Belt-mounted chem lights were used to identify competitors and range officers. A brilliant safety precaution!

Belt-mounted chem lights were used to identify competitors and range officers. A brilliant safety precaution!

Note the last two popper targets falling to a barrage of 12 gauge shot from a box-magazine Saiga.

Note the last two popper targets falling to a barrage of 12 gauge shot from a box-magazine Saiga.

The Stage planners had a great time hiding shotgun targets behind barrels. Twice as hard to find in the dark!

The Stage planners had a great time hiding shotgun targets behind barrels. Twice as hard to find in the dark!

Stage walk through.

Stage walk through.

House clearing with a light and laser-equipped AR-15.

House clearing with a light and laser-equipped AR-15.

Highly-visible green lasers were popular.

Highly-visible green lasers were popular.

Note all the brass in the air from the full auto PWS Diablo. This side match was during daylight hours.

Note all the brass in the air from the full auto PWS Diablo. This side match was during daylight hours.

This car got pretty beat up by by four straight nights of grenade catching.

This car got pretty beat up by four straight nights of grenade catching.

Nope. Not quite dark enough to start the evening events.

Nope. Not quite dark enough to start the evening events.

Jerry, Kay and Lena Miculek gearing up.

Jerry, Kay and Lena Miculek gearing up.

A Primary Weapons System Diablo and an AAC suppressed Glock - some of the required gear for a house clearing stage.

A Primary Weapons System Diablo and an AAC suppressed Glock – some of the required gear for a house clearing stage.

Gearing up before sunset.

Gearing up before sunset.

Top Shot winner Chris Cheng strategizing for his first stage of the night.

Top Shot winner Chris Cheng strategizing for his first stage of the night.

Taking aim at some handgun targets in the dark.

Taking aim at some handgun targets in the dark.

Note the path of the light and laser. The green one at left shows the path of the shotgun laser.

Note the path of the light and laser. The green one at left shows the path of the shotgun laser.

Nothing quite like a little machine-gunning in the dark!

Nothing quite like a little machine-gunning in the dark!

Getting ready to unleash the SAW, which of course was equipped with night vision optics!

Getting ready to unleash the SAW, which of course was equipped with night vision optics!

A time lapse view of a stage in the event.

A time-lapse view of a stage in the event.

Top Junior Shooter Wyatt Gibson of Team Colt Competition receives his award.

Top Junior Shooter Wyatt Gibson of Team Colt Competition receives his award.

Lena Miculek took the Top Ladies Prize.

Lena Miculek took the Top Ladies Prize.

Once again, US Army Marksmanship Unit shooter Daniel Horner took top overall honors.

Once again, US Army Marksmanship Unit shooter Daniel Horner took top overall honors.

 

Crimson Trace’s Midnight 3 Gun Invitational: Enlightened in the Dark

How does a company prove that they have absolute faith in their products?

Unloading an AR-15, in the middle of the night, as fast as you can acquire targets, looks kind of like this. Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Event

Unloading an AR-15, in the middle of the night, as fast as you can acquire targets, looks kind of like this. Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Event

If you’re Crimson Trace, and your products were designed to help our warfighters, peace officers, and armed citizens protect themselves more effectively, you might…

  • Invite a bunch of folks to the middle of the desert.
  • Tell them to be sure to arrive in the middle of the night.
  • Encourage them to bring not one gun, but three. And plenty of ammunition.
  • Ask them to use your light and laser products.
  • Then, after all that, have them run around and shoot stuff as fast as they possibly can.

In today’s risk-averse society, that sounds kind of crazy doesn’t it? Somehow I can’t see the gutless leadership teams of Fortune 500 companies having that much faith in the capabilities of their products–and their customers. But that’s what I love about the shooting industry. Not just the sense of absolute faith and pride in the products, but the inherent trust that individuals involved will assume personal responsibility for safety and fun–in that order. Hats off to Crimson Trace for putting their money where their mouth is!

For the second year in a row, Crimson Trace invited members of the media and some of the best 3-gun shooters to participate in the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational. Set at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association in the high desert about 30 miles outside of Bend, Oregon, this match is a back to the basics affair. Electricity? Nope. Running water? Nope. Absolute darkness? Yep.

Read the rest at OutdoorHub.com!

Anatomy of a Stage at the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational

I just finished shooting and covering the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational in the high desert miles and miles from Bend, Oregon. It was an enlightening experience, and I’ll write about that in my weekly column on OutdoorHub.com. Shooting at night was also ridiculously fun. More fun than should be legal, perhaps. To give you an idea of what it was like, let’s look at just one of the 9 stages of the event. Keep in mind, this all happens in the pitch dark between 9pm and 3am. 

It almost looks easy. In the daylight.

It almost looks easy. In the daylight.

Hey, the following scenario could happen in real life. Right?

First, pick up your fully automatic SCAR, equipped with light and laser of course, and engage two, two-dimensional (cardboard) bad guys. That’s an easy one, problem solved!

There are not too many problems a grenade launcher won't solve.

There are not too many problems a grenade launcher won’t solve.

But wait, as you’re putting down your SCAR to celebrate your success with a post engagement cookie, you notice a car full of evildoers intent on doing you harm. Fortunately, you have an FN grenade launcher loaded and ready for action. From about 50 yards away, using a Crimson Trace RailMaster green laser aiming system, lob a 40mm grenade through the driver side window. Problem solved.

But hordes of evil two-dimensional dudes are called hordes for a reason. You see more headed your way. You notice 8 of them about 20 yards away. Drawing your Glock 17 equipped with Crimson Trace Lasergrip and Lightguard, you sprint in their direction and hit each twice while on the run. Good thing you have a pistol mounted light as they’re blending into a sandy berm, and hard to spot. 

These evil d00dz are about to get SCARed in full auto mode.

These evil d00dz are about to get SCARed in full auto mode.

But, as you can probably guess, there is no rest for the weary. 8 ground-dwelling DHS drones, looking deceptively like steel plates set in the ground, are headed your way. As you continue to move towards the threats, you take out a couple of them with the remaining rounds in your Glock.

And that’s when the real trouble starts. Your Glock runs dry, and there are still drones to engage. 

No worries, just grab your Lightguard equipped shotgun. While heading down the dark path, whack em’ with some bird shot loads. and take them out.

It’s only then that you spot 8 NSA disk drives with recordings of all your most personal online conversations, cleverly disguised as 4 inch clay targets. These are scattered across a wide area in the sand, so it’s a good thing you have a tac lite to spot them. 

This is how the stage looks in the dark. You can easily see the need for lights and lasers!

This is how the stage looks in the dark. You can easily see the need for lights and lasers!

After you deal with those you can take a brief rest, until the next stage. 

And so it goes. 9 different stages designed to force reliance on lights, lasers and skill. Just for fun, there’s a daylight hours side match, where you clear six buildings with a fully automatic PWS Diablo short barrel rifle. As you have daylight on your side, that seems easy in comparison. 

Running around the desert shooting all night long is exhausting. But given the chance, count me in to do it again!

Gearing Up for the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Event: Handgun Selection

The “lots and lots of 9mm” vs. “a handful of big .45′s” debate is about as likely to be settled as Michael Moore speaking at the NRA 2014 Annual Meeting.

While most discussion focuses on real-life pros and cons of a magazine full of 9mm ammo vs. seven or eight big and fat .45 ACP’s, I have an opportunity to consider the tradeoffs in a less threatening manner.

Hmmm. Tough choice. Both pistols have compatible light and laser features.

Hmmm. Tough choice. Both pistols have compatible light and laser features.

This August, I’ll be shooting in the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational competition and I need to start thinking about equipment choices. The only constraint I am placing on my decision is the use of Crimson Trace only light and laser gear. Other than that, I’m open to possibilities.

I’m competing in the Range Officer and Media pre-event, so my decision on gear won’t have any impact on the big prize potential. I’m not that fast anyway. So I’m looking at this event as an opportunity to explore viable options for home defense setups and get some dead-of-night practice with light and laser equipped pistols, rifles and shotguns. During the actual competition, I’ll be free to cover the real competitors and report on their gear selections and match performance.

So far, I am strongly considering two handgun options. There’s a third possibility, but it’s a little bit silly. Fun, and certainly dramatic, but silly. I admit it.

Option 1:  Springfield Armory 1911 TRP with Crimson Trace Lightguard and Master Series Lasergrips

Does it make sense for 3 Gun? Not really, but it's SO sweet!

Does it make sense for 3 Gun? Not really, but it’s SO sweet!

This is a high-quality .45 ACP 1911 – we reviewed it a while back and found it to be lacking, well, nothing. With standard factory magazines, it offers 7+1 capacity. Granted, that’s not ideal for the high round count sport of 3 gun shooting.

Right now, I have a set of rosewood Crimson Trace Master Series Lasergrips on this gun. This set features a traditional red laser, which will be fine for nighttime use at the match. However, I just got a set of LG-401G green 1911 Lasergrips. These have black polymer side panels, so they won’t look quite as spiffy as the rosewood grips. On the other hand, the Springfield Armory TRP has a black frame and slide, so there would be that trendy black on black color combination…

This gun also features the Crimson Trace LTG-701 Lightguard for 1911 pistols. While also front-activated, the button is on the underside of the trigger guard. This means that it’s compatible with the Lasergrips. The bottom of your middle finger activates the laser while the side of the same finger activates the light. Nifty.

While I would be severely handicapped by necessity of more frequent magazine changes, isn’t there some benefit to the really satisfying sound that .45 bullets will make hitting those steel targets? And of course, the holes in the paper targets will be impressively large compared to those wimpy 9mm perforations made by my competitors.

Option 2: Glock 17 Gen 4 with Crimson Trace Lightguard and Lasergrips

The safe choice? A Glock Gen 4 with Crimson Trace light and laser?

The safe choice? A Glock Gen 4 with Crimson Trace light and laser?

This one is the safe option. A 17+1 standard magazine capacity, means hardly any, if any magazine changes. I guess that depends on my panic under the clock miss-rate performance though.

I’ve got the Glock 17 Gen 4 configured with a Crimson Trace Lightguard and Crimson Trace LG-850 rear-activated laser. As the Lightguard is front-activated and the Lasergrip rear-activated, these two components are made to work together.

Clearly this is the safe choice. Even now, 9mm ammo is available and (relatively) cheap compared to the other options. Capacity is grande and recoil is minimal so even a moderate shooter like me can do fast follow-up shots. As the steel targets just need to “clang” and not get knocked over, so 9mm has plenty of oomph.

Option 3: Glock 31 Gen 4 with Crimson Trace Lightguard and Lasergrips

Ok, this option really makes no sense at all, as it has less capacity than the Glock 17 9mm and a lot more recoil to manage. I just have a fetish with the .357 Sig cartridge for some unexplainable reason. And it’s my nightstand gun. Remember when I said earlier that one of the goals was to run some realistic home defense gear through the match course?

Although there is one potential benefit to shooting the Glock 31 with its .357 Sig cartridge. The gigantic fireballs and muzzle flash just might temporarily blind the other competitors, allowing me to coast to an un-contested victory. Here’s hoping.

Given my goals for the match, what say you?

A Brief History of Guns, The Early Years…

Here’s an excerpt from our brand new book, The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition. It’s part of the Insanely Practical Guides series and is loaded with light-hearted education, lots of helpful photos and some comedic relief. Hope you enjoy!

Before there were guns...

Before there were guns…

Guns have been annoying politicians longer than you might think. Before we jump into modern day firearm knowledge, let’s take a look at the long and winding road of gun history…

1,100 BC

Legends of the earliest known uses of guns have been passed down through generations of Zoran women. Historians believe that many women folk of Zorah, then near Philistine, gushed and swooned at the sight of Samson’s guns. According to the folklore, Samson had two guns, of exceptionally large caliber. Also according to history, he used those guns on more than one occasion – smiting at least one lion and many Philistine warriors. Sadly, the Zoran Congress, led by Senator Delilah of Timna, Philistia, soon enacted an assault hair ban and Samson was stripped of his guns.

 

1250 AD

Most historians believe that the key ingredient required to make all those useless guns work was invented around this time. In fact, NRA National Firearms Museum Director Jim Supica claims that Franciscan monk Roger Bacon wrote of the mixture shortly before 1250 A.D. That was an awfully long time ago – just after the birth of Joan Rivers.

Anyway, according to Bacon’s ancient texts, the lute and dulcimer trio of Guns and Roses discovered gunpowder while searching for better ways to wow the crowd at outdoor concerts. The forward-thinking band found that a mixture of charcoal, sulphur and salt peter provided plenty of noise and flash for bitchin’ stage theatrics. Salt Peter, Saint Peter’s long-lost stepbrother, was not at all happy about this recipe and he immediately started work on development of smokeless powders that did not require any of his bodily parts. Progress was slow as smokeless powder was not invented until the late 19th century.

 

1300

The earliest cannons appeared on the scene. After all, what good was the newly invented gunpowder without something to shoot it from? Early cannons were quite simple – nothing more than a tube open on one end and closed at the other. A small hole near the closed end allowed cannoneers to light a powder charge inside. Crudely constructed from iron, wood and sometimes Mighty Putty, these weapons applied the same basic principles used by guns today.

 

1350

While loud and impressive, early cannons did little to meet self-defense requirements. Since gun holsters had not yet been invented, concealed carry was not feasible. Hunting with the newly invented firearms was also problematic as many animals were reluctant to stand in front of cannons long enough to be converted to SPAM. In response to complaints of supermarket butchers everywhere, the “hand-gonne” was invented. Simply a downsized cannon mounted on a pole, the hand-gonne struggled for popularity mainly because no one knew how to pronounce the word “gonne.”

 

1400 to 1639

Clearing up name confusion, people stopped making “hand-gonnes” and replaced them with matchlocks and wheellocks. Matchlock guns featured an exposed flash pan filled with fine – and easy to ignite – priming powder, which would light the main charge to fire the gun. A dangling, and lit, fuse was suspended over the flashpan. A mechanical linkage was used to lower the smoldering fuse into the highly combustible flash pan. Occasionally, the matchlocks would fire when the user wanted, but usually before, after or not at all.

 

1526

The gun company Beretta is founded in the Foccacia region of Italy, in a town called Brescia. Having made guns prior to this date, company founder Ben Cartwright achieves his first commercial success with production of 185 Arquebus Matchlock barrels for the Arsenal of Venice. The British Secret Service, Double-0 branch, is issued the 186th Arquebus. England quietly canceled the Double-0 program when it was discovered that matchlock rifles concealed poorly under dinner jackets.

 

1640

The first kinda, sorta reliable flintlock was built. Some astute marketers even guaranteed their flintlocks to be 31% reliable, 67% of the time. Offering major advancements in luxury and comfort, such as heated drivers-side seats, the flintlock allowed shooters to carry their guns pretty much anywhere, except schools and government buildings, of course. As the flintlock features a covered flash pan for priming powder, users could even take their guns into rainy conditions. No longer would major World Wars endure rain delays, thereby minimizing network television scheduling challenges.

As a side note, the phrase “keep your powder dry” came into vogue during the flintlock era. As guns of the time relied on ignition of two separate powder charges – one in the flash pan and one in the barrel – keeping powder dry and flammable was a requirement of guns going bang instead of fzzzlpphhtt.

Stay tuned for the the next phase in firearm history…

The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition is available on Amazon.com now!

The Rookie's Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition from Insanely Practical Guides

The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition from Insanely Practical Guides

The Seven Deadly Sins of Handgun Shooting: The Cup and Saucer Grip

One of my very favorite things is to take new shooters to the range. My second favorite thing is simply seeing new shooters at the range. My least favorite thing is to see folks launch into their shooting career without any instruction, thereby developing a bunch of bad, and sometimes unsafe, habits. To help them along, I’ve put together some tips that will help improve anyone’s handgun shooting skills. After all, it’s much cooler to look like a pro on the range, even when you’re brand new to the sport.

Cup and saucer handgun grip

Using a cup and saucer handgun grip is just about this effective.

I have scientific proof that the “cup and saucer” handgun grip is bad and bordering on evil. Check this out. If you rearrange the letters in “cup and saucer” you get the following secret phrases:

Arcane Cud Pus

Uncaused Crap

Rude Caca Puns

Freaky isn’t it? Who knew that “cup and saucer” was some type of satanic code?

Now that we can agree that a cup and saucer grip is bad form and just plain spooky, what exactly is it? More importantly, how does one go about exorcising that demon?

Read the rest at OutdoorHub.com!

The Seven Deadly Sins of Handgun Shooting: Doin’ The Bernie

We’ve started a new project – a weekly column at OutdoorHub.com. The current series describes the Seven Deadly Sins of Handgun Shooting. Hope you enjoy!

7 Deadly Sins of Handgun Shooting - Doin The Bernie

Here’s our model shooter doin’ the Bernie. Or facing a hurricane–we’re not sure which.

The ’80s movie Weekend at Bernie’s was a pop icon film that exemplified heart-wrenching and soulful acting, panoramic cinematography, and helpful tips on how to party with a dead guy. Why it was shunned from Academy Award consideration remains a mystery, although industry insiders have long suspected a voter fraud scheme by Morgan Freeman and the producers of Driving Miss Daisy.

Weekend at Bernie’s is not only a golden example of the silver screen art form, it demonstrates dozens of important practical life tips. For example, if you ever find yourself dead as a result of forced heroin overdose by Mafia hit men, you can still party for days on end simply by wearing sunglasses.

You can also inspire short-lived fads like popular YouTube dances. In this case, it’s called the “Bernie,” or in some circles, “moving like Bernie.” If you watch someone doin’ the Bernie, you’ll notice the essence of the dance is a severe and painful backwards lean.

Which brings us to this weeks installment of the Seven Deadly Sins of Handgun Shooting: doin’ the Bernie.

Read the rest at OutdoorHub.com!

 

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