Silencing the 300 AAC Blackout

You have to admit, a silencer makes any rifle cooler - like this SilencerCo Specwar 762 on a Daniel Defense DDM4v5 300 Blackout.

You have to admit, a silencer makes any rifle cooler – like this SilencerCo Specwar 762 on a Daniel Defense DDM4v5 300 Blackout.

Last time we got into an ammunition geek-fest and talked about the variety of commercial ammo available for the 300 AAC Blackout and the endless tinkering you can do as a reloader for that caliber.

Perhaps even more fun than creating endless varieties of ammunition for the 300 AAC Blackout is shooting it with silencers. With subsonic cartridges, usually those firing 208 grain or heavier projectiles at velocities of 1,000 fps or so, you’ll have some serious quiet. Even when using supersonic 300 AAC Blackout ammunition, you’ll notice a dramatically improved shooting experience. Supersonic rounds will still make that little sonic boom, or crack from the bullet traveling through the air, but the gun shot will sound more like a “whoosh” than a “bang.” Hard to describe in words, it’s a little bit like air brakes on a truck. Know what I mean? Trust me, it’s cool.

Before we get started, let me clear up some terminology. Silencer is the correct legal term, and the one coined by Hiram Percy Maxim back in 1902 when he invented the Maxim Silencer. For a long time, the industry used the term “suppressor,” as it was more descriptive. A silencer doesn’t completely silence after all. Recently, industry folks are moving back to the term “silencer” but you’ll see both terms used interchangeably, and both are technically correct – just in different ways.

Let’s talk about some things to consider when silencing the 300 AAC Blackout and close with a look at a few good silencer options currently on the market.

Your gun will experience “the change.”

Even 300 Blackout ammo is cool like these Gemtech 187 grain subsonic rounds.

Even 300 Blackout ammo is cool like these Gemtech 187 grain subsonic rounds.

More likely than not, your rifle will have a point of impact shift when you add a silencer. In plain english, this simply means that the bullet will hit in a different spot when the silencer is on as compared to when it’s off. Just to be clear, assuming you have a half decent gun, your groups will be consistent with and without a silencer, they’ll just be in different places on the paper. Usually, this is not a huge deal – an inch or two difference.

For example, after shooting a bunch of groups with my Daniel Defense DDM4v5 300 AAC Blackout rifle, I added a SilencerCo / SWR Specwar 762. Measuring the distance between before and after groups, I noticed that my rifle impacted about 1 inch lower and ¾ inches to the right at 50 yards when using the silencer. Your results will almost certainly vary as the “change” results from different barrel harmonics. Every silencer is different and every rifle and barrel combination is different. In any case, this is nothing to get concerned about. You’re not likely to see any dramatic shifts, just be aware that you’ll need to re-zero your optic.

I actually noticed a slight improvement in accuracy when I added the suppressor. While not dramatic, groups using identical ammo in identical conditions shrunk just a bit. Again, your results may vary. Have a little fun testing before and after point of impact and accuracy effects to see how your rifle responds.

Read the rest at GunsAmerica!

 

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The Rookie's Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition

The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition

Howard Leight Impact PRO and Impact Sport Hearing Protection

You can think of the difference between the Impact Pro (left) and Impact Sport (right) as heavy duty and moderate duty. Or you can consider the possible uses or pistol vs. rifle and shotgun.

You can think of the difference between the Impact Pro (left) and Impact Sport (right) as heavy duty and moderate duty. Or you can consider the possible uses or pistol vs. rifle and shotgun.

You know how the saying goes. Once you go electronic, you never go back.

Foam ear plugs are gross and not all that effective. Custom fit earplugs work great, but you can’t hear a darn thing when you’re wearing them. Passive exterior ear muffs also work really well, but still, you’re essentially deaf to what’s going on around you. You know, deaf to important things, like what the instructor or range safety officer is saying.

Enter electronic hearing protection. While you can get custom fit electronic devices to go in your ear, they’re uber expensive. They’re fit only to you and you can’t really share them with a friend or family member unless you have identical ear canal genes.

Howard Leight offers a couple of different models that accommodate most, if not all, shooting scenarios. The Impact Pro and Impact Sport models have different goals and we’ll talk about this in a bit more detail in a minute.

First, let’s look at what these units have in common.

The Impact Sport models are available in forest green, Mossy Oak camo or the teal shown here.

The Impact Sport models are available in forest green, Mossy Oak camo or the teal shown here.

Both Impact Pro and Impact Sport models will amplify ambient sound so you can hear what’s going on around you – even better than when you’re not wearing the muffs.

Both automatically and electronically reduce gunfire or impulse noise above 82 decibels to help protect your hearing. Remember, each and every exposure to dangerous level sounds permanently damages your hearing, a little bit more each time. It adds up and you never get it back. Always use good ear protection when shooting!

Both have what I consider to be a fantastic usability feature: a single on/off and sound level dial that is recessed into only one side. Stay with me a sec, this is important. Most electronic ear muffs have a knob on each side that sticks out from the ear muff body. Turn the knob past a click and it goes on. Keep turning to increase the volume. Invariably, when you toss this style of ear muff into your shooting back, they will get turned on as the knobs are exposed to whatever junk is around them. Your batteries will run dry. Next time you arrive at the range, one or both sides of the muffs will be, in the words of Patches O’Houlihan, “about as useful as a poopy flavored lollipop.” The recessed dial on the Impact series won’t get inadvertently turned on and the dial is only on one side to control both muffs. Simple, clever and it’s kind of a big deal. Oh, if you do somehow manage to leave them on, they’ll turn off after four hours automatically. You’ll still have plenty of the 350 hour battery life left.

While we’re talking about nice touches, the battery compartment is accessible from the outside. Other electronic muffs have the battery compartment under foam panels inside of the ear muff itself. This means they get all sweaty and icky when it’s warm. Here in the swamps of South Carolina, I have to remember to remove batteries and prop open the foam covers of other makes to keep them from corroding. Gross. With the Howard Leight models, since the battery compartment is not exposed to the interior, where things get sweaty, you don’t have to perform after shooting drying maintenance.

The Impact Pro and Impact Sport models also feature input jacks for iPods and other music players. You can play Pharrell Williams’ Happy song over and over at the range.

Both models feature insert power and volume adjustment dials and input jacks for music players.

Both models feature insert power and volume adjustment dials and input jacks for music players.

Howard Leight Impact Sport

The primary goal of the Impact Sport model is a low profile. They’re intended for shotgun and rifle shooting and the thin profile helps keep the ear muffs out of the way when you squash your face against a rifle or shotgun stock.

They do amplify safe levels of ambient sound, like conversation, up to three times normal level. At a noisy range, you can carry on a perfectly normal conversation while remaining protected from gunshot noises.

You can find Howard Leight Impact Sport ear muffs in green, Mossy Oak camo or the teal color shown here.

When it comes to ear muffs, smaller size comes at a price. The noise reduction capability is less than that of the Impact Pro models. The Impact Sport ear muffs are rated with 22dB NRR. For outdoor use, these work fine. If you shoot at an indoor range, or use mostly handguns, you’ll want the…

Howard Leight Impact Pro

The Howard Leight Impact Pro electronic hearing protection ear muffs are super-sized electronic high-attenuating wonders. They’re noticeably thicker and as a result, dampen sound exceptionally well. The electronic circuitry reduces dangerous noise, like gun shots, over 82 decibels and also amplifies normal conversation by a factor of four. It’s kind of like having bionic hearing. Cool and functional.

As I shoot mostly pistols and AR type rifles, I find myself using the Impact Pro models more frequently. For me, the wider body doesn’t get in the way when shooting an AR. When I switch to shotguns, I prefer the Impact Sport.

You can find the Howard Leight Impact Sport model for about $50 and the Howard Leight Impact Pro model for about $70.

ATI’s Ruger 10/22 AR-22 Stock System: Turn Your .22 Into a Tactical Beast

Believe it or not, this was a plain Ruger 10/22 Carbine not long ago...

Believe it or not, this was a plain Ruger 10/22 Carbine not long ago…

This week we’re going to invest in plastic surgery. No Kardashians will be involved, I promise.

While many might argue that I myself need it, I’m going to direct this decidedly non-medical procedure at a plain Ruger 10/22 Carbine .22LR plinker. The Ruger 10/22 Carbine is the basic model, with wood stock that usually sells for a street price of less than $250.

I’m going to turn it into… exactly the same rifle it was before. It will have the same functionally, but with a few cosmetic and usability improvements. You know, the kind of changes that turn a rifle into an assault weapon, whatever that is. It will have the same operating system. It will have the same magazine capacity. It will have the same caliber. It will not fire grenades. But it will look exceptionally cool. It will be easier to handle. It will be adjustable to fit shooters of different sizes and statures. It will probably make Michael Bloomberg apoplectic for no good reason at all.

What is it?

I’m talking about the ATI Ruger® 10/22® AR-22 Stock System with 8-Sided Forend. This complete stock replacement kit turns your vanilla Ruger into a tactical beast. Yeah, it’s really cool looking and incredibly fun to shoot.

Yes, some of the features are purely cosmetic, like the forward assist, safety lever, charging handle and bolt release. That’s OK, because the way the system is designed, those functions (barring the forward assist) are all covered by the existing buttons and levers on the Ruger 10/22 receiver. The idea is to provide a look and feel alike rifle to a standard AR type – great for practice and training at much lower cost to shoot.

What makes the ATI kit useful for your Ruger 10/22 are the functions that it adds. For example, the six position stock. Like a real AR-type rifle, the stock is adjustable from short to long length of pull along a faux buffer tube made of aluminum. The stock has a nice (and soft) butt pad to absorb whatever recoil your .22LR load of choice has. More importantly, the butt pad serves to provide solid placement on your shoulder so the rifle doesn’t move around when you’re emptying a 25 round magazine at a platoon of hubbard squash. The warts on that stuff are creepy.

While we’re talking about the stock improvements, an even more important feature is the adjustable cheek rest. You can raise and lower this using a screwdriver. Got low scope rings? No problem. Got a high mount just like your .223 Remington / 5.56mm AR? No problem. Adjust away. Oh, and the cheek rest has a soft rubber pad on top to protect your jawbone from the earth-shattering recoil of the .22LR.

The kit also adds a pistol grip, so if you want to use cheap (in comparison to .223 / 5.56mm) rounds for practice, it will feel somewhat like your AR type rifle. As a nice extra, the pistol grip has a textured rubber back strap and feels great during extended shooting sessions.

 

Read the rest at OutdoorHub!

 

The Rookie's Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition

The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition

The GunBox: Secure, Yet Accessible Storage For Your Handgun

The GunBox is sized to hold even a large gun along with spare magazine.

The GunBox is sized to hold even a large gun along with spare magazine.

Here’s an accessory that is supremely elegant, tasteful in appearance, but the with constitution of a tank.

The GunBox looks like a high-tech computer or sound system accessory. Its space-age appearance and sleek looks won’t give away its real purpose – safe and secure storage of a handgun.

I spent some quality time with a pre-production model and here’s what I found.

The GunBox is built like a tank – no doubt about that. Someone would have to work hard to break into it. But that’s beside the point. The primary idea of something like a gun box is to keep unauthorized hands away from your gun. If your primary concern is protection from fire and/or burglary, then get a 1,500 pound safe and bolt it to your floor.

The GunBox does offer some anti-theft features. You can mount the GunBox to wall studs or perhaps a heavy piece of furniture. It even features a Kensington style cable lock interface that allows use of a sturdy cable lock. These features will help deter theft of the entire box, but it’s not something you want to rely on to protect from burglary.

The idea behind the GunBox is to keep little fingers off of your gun, yet keep it instantly available to you in case of emergency. The classic use case of something like a gun box is safe, yet accessible, storage on your nightstand. Your gun is secure from children or guests, but you can get access to it any time you like.

 

When used on a nightstand or desk, the dual USB ports are handy for charging phones or other devices.

When used on a nightstand or desk, the dual USB ports are handy for charging phones or other devices.

The GunBox has different options for secure access to the interior. The primary access method is via an RFID chip embedded in the unit itself. Simply wave a provided bracelet or ring over the top of the box, and it opens automatically. You can also get a fingerprint scanner in addition to the RFID lock. The fingerprint scanner allows you to store multiple fingerprints so you can open it with different fingers on your own hands, and also program fingerprints from a spouse or significant other. In my testing, I found that I could open the box with any orientation of my finger on the scan pad – it didn’t require me to achieve perfect, or even consistent, placement.

Other options available with the GunBox include a motion sensor alarm which makes a loud beeping sound when somebody is messing with the unit, for example, attempting to open or steal it. The premier model offers GPS tracking and 7×24 alarm service that will notify you by text message of unusual activity.

The GunBox includes an RFID bracelet as the default opening tool and AC power adapter.

The GunBox includes an RFID bracelet as the default opening tool and AC power adapter.

The construction and mechanics are elegant. One nice touch is the inclusion of two pneumatic pistons that assist the opening of the door when unlocked. Instead of just flinging open by spring power, the door gently opens in a controlled fashion. The lock itself is a motor driven affair. Using the fingerprint scanner or RFID sensor, a motor is activated which slides a metal bar off of a fixed piston in the lower half of the unit, thereby allowing the pneumatic pistons to gently the door. One thing that I found slightly annoying was the noise of the motor. It gently grinds for several seconds in the process of unlocking. I couldn’t help but think how loud that would be in a dead quiet house, in the middle of the night.

The GunBox is a nice piece of gear. When it comes to safety, it doesn’t benefit you or anyone else to skimp on quality. This box is secure from unauthorized use yet offers dependable options for immediate access. If your home has kids or frequent guests, then you owe it to them to secure your guns.

A Beretta 92 and the Sounds of Silence…

Here's a happy combination: a Beretta 92FS and SilencerCo Octane

Here’s a happy combination: a Beretta 92FS and SilencerCo Octane

According to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, there are just under 600,000 silencers registered in the U.S. as required by the National Firearms Act. With the current backlog of 74,000 applications for NFA classified guns, that number is rapidly growing.

Why? Silencers are polite. While they don’t hush gunshots to whispers as depicted in the movies, they do reduce the ear-damaging noise of a gunshot to safer levels. When folks are using silencers at a shooting range or training class, students can easily hear range commands. New shooters avoid the tendency to flinch away from the loud bang when that bang is muffled. Neighboring homes and businesses will also appreciate the reduction of noise.

Depending on your configuration and ammunition choice, you may not need hearing protection at all. As hearing damage is permanent, be sure to carefully review the performance specifications of your silencer and ammunition choice before leaving the hearing protection in your shooting bag.

I’ve got a well used Beretta 92FS that’s been one of my perennial favorites. I love the feel, the weight, the balance and how softly it shoots even +P 9mm loads. You could say it fits me like a glove. It’s also been the most reliable handgun in my safe. It eats any and all types of 9mm ammunition and never jams. Ever.
Whether intentional or not, the Beretta 92 is a perfect handgun for use with a silencer. The barrel naturally extends past the front of the slide – enough for a competent gunsmith to cut threading so a silencer can be mounted. The open-top slide presents even more forgiveness for proper cycling, with which a silencer can interfere.

For these reasons, I decided it was time to suppress this bad boy.

Because of my insatiable need to tinker with gun configurations, I wanted to get a silencer that was multi-purpose – one that could be used on different caliber handguns and even a subsonic rifle. For this reason, I elected to acquire a SilencerCo Octane 45. Getting the .45 caliber version meant that my silencer would be a tad longer and heavier, but on the positive side, I could use it with .45, .40 S&W, 9mm, .380 and even .22LR handguns. This one is even rated for use with a 300 AAC Blackout subsonic rifle. Talk about versatility!

Read the rest at Beretta USA!

Adventures With A .22 Silencer: The SilencerCo Sparrow

The SilencerCo Sparrow 22 on a Smith & Wesson M&P 22.

The SilencerCo Sparrow 22 on a Smith & Wesson M&P 22.

There’s not much more fun in recreational shooting than a .22 with a Silencer. Note I said “silencer” instead of “suppressor.”

While “suppressor” is a more technically accurate term, the original devices were named silencers. Maxim Silencers, in fact. Hiram Percy Maxim, not to be confused with his machine gun inventing dad, Hiram Stevens Maxim, is the guy whom most people believe invented the gun silencer. Not surprisingly, Hiram Percy also worked on early automobile mufflers as the basic principles are similar – taming hot and noisy gases after combustion.

For a long time, the industry drifted towards referring to “gun mufflers” as suppressors, but over the past few years I’ve noticed that most companies have gone back to the traditional name – silencers.

A few weeks ago, my BATFE Form 4, Application for Tax Paid Transfer and Registration of a Firearm came back from 10 months of hibernation on some faceless bureaucrat’s desk. Receipt of that precious document meant that I could pick up my SilencerCo Sparrow 22 Suppressor that was also in a 10 month deep sleep at my local FFL dealer. After dusting off the box and using carbon dating technology, I determined that it was, in fact, 10 months old. At least it’s new to me, right?

Let’s take a closer look at the SilencerCo Sparrow 22 and some gun and ammo options to go with it.

The SilencerCo Sparrow 22 Specs

Simply put, the SilencerCo Sparrow is a whole lot of fun in a small package. It measures just five inches long and a hair over one inch in diameter. Its total weight is just 6.5 ounces. It’s a rimfire design, although it is rated for the FN 5.7×28 centerfire cartridge. If you’ve got a .22LR, .22 Magnum, .17 HMR you’re in business. It will even handle .22LR in full-automatic operation if you’ve got such a thing.

For testing, but mainly just fun, I mounted the SilencerCo Sparrow 22 on two different guns: a Smith & Wesson M&P 22 pistol and a Colt / Umarex M4 Carbine chambered in .22LR. The Sparrow 22 comes with a standard 1/2×28 thread mount. Both guns required an adapter piece to mount the silencer. Some M&P 22’s models are available with threaded barrels, but the threads don’t extend past the slide. Adding a Tactical Innovations thread adapter and extender provided the proper mount for the Sparrow 22. The Colt Carbine also required a thread adapter to convert the standard barrel threads to the required 1/2×24 mount. With the adapters in place, mounting the SilencerCo Sparrow was a piece of cake – just screw it on until hand tight. While I did not encounter any loosening of the silencer, be sure to check once in a while to make sure it’s stills screwed on tight.

Here you can see the Tactical Innovations thread adapter on the pistol. Adding the Crimson Trace Laserguard turned out to be an "extra fun" bonus.

Here you can see the Tactical Innovations thread adapter on the pistol. Adding the Crimson Trace Rail Master turned out to be an “extra fun” bonus.

The Smith & Wesson M&P 22 with the SilencerCo Sparrow 22 was a beautiful combination. The MNP 22 is a full size 22 handgun, yet is very lightweight. Because the Sparrow 22 is only one inch in diameter, it did not interfere with the standard sights on this gun at all. I couldn’t leave well enough alone, so I added a Crimson Trace Rail Master with a green beam for improved daylight visibility. The Smith & Wesson M&P 22 has a standard rail, so this was an easy upgrade. Unless you’re opposed to giggling like a kindergartener, add a laser to your suppressed .22. Trust me.

Even though I was nowhere near bored with the pistol configuration, I moved the Sparrow to the Colt M4 Carbine 22. With its even higher iron sights, there was no issue with the silencer obstructing the sight picture. With the longer barrel, the rifle configuration was even quieter. Since I had to remove the muzzle brake, there was very little change in the overall length of the rifle with the Sparrow 22 attached.

Read the rest at Outdoor Hub!

 

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Mossberg FLEX System: When One Gun Is Enough

I’ve seen magazine ads for the Mossberg FLEX system for sometime now, but have not had the opportunity to kick the tires, so to speak, until now.

The Mossberg FLEX system allows you to swap stocks, grips and butt pads quickly and easily.

The Mossberg FLEX system allows you to swap stocks, grips and butt pads quickly and easily.

If you’re not familiar with the Mossberg FLEX, the idea is a system of interchangeable parts, like stocks, grips, buttpads and forends, that allow you to quickly and easily reconfigure a rifle or shotgun. There are plenty of good reasons you might want to do this.

  • Seasonal clothing changes. If your shotgun or rifle fits you perfectly in the cold months when you wear heavy clothing, it might be a bit long in the stock during the summer t-shirt months.
  • You may want to share the same rifle or shotgun with another person who requires a different length of pull than you – a child for instance?
  • Maybe you want to use one gun for hunting and home defense. Why not mount a solid stock for hunting outings and a collapsible for home defense use?
Butt pads are a piece of cake to swap. A button on the bottom of the stock releases one, so you can add a different size.

Butt pads are a piece of cake to swap. A button on the bottom of the stock releases one, so you can add a different size.

Before I saw the system I had hesitations about the about how solid this the mounts would be. After all, the stock is the focal point for heavy recoil forces in shotguns and rifles. At the recent Professional Outdoor Media Conference (POMA) I had the opportunity to swap some stocks and shoot.

I found the locking system to be rock solid and here’s why. Mossberg uses zinc fixtures on both male and female sides of the locking mechanism between the stock and receiver. The locking mechanism is similar and appearance and function to AR style barrel extension and bolt carrier the way the two pieces locked together. A semicircular lever lifts out of the stock itself and twists 90° to release the mechanism. A quick bump with your hand and the two halves come apart. It’s a tight fit and I could detect no “play” at all between the receiver and stock.

You can also swap the butt pad for different sizes with a simple button release on the bottom of the stock. The butt pads are designed to snap in place and are available in small, medium and large sizes. Mossberg also offers different sizes of stocks blanks so you actually have two ways to customize. First you choose the stock you want, then select the desired butt pad. Couldn’t be easier.

Mossberg makes the FLEX system for 12 gauge 500 series shotguns, 7.62mm and 5.56mm MVP bolt action magazine fed rifles, 20 gauge shotguns and now FLEX-22 rifles.

Cool stuff.

A Great Reason To Take Your iPhone Or iPad To The Shooting Range

The Bullseye Camera iPhone application. It's got all the basics you need to monitor shots up to one mile downrange.

The Bullseye Camera iPhone application. It’s got all the basics you need to monitor shots up to one mile downrange.

Back in September I wrote about a new product that’s a must have accessory for rifle shooters – The Bullseye Camera System.

The iPad version provides the same functionality, just on a larger screen.

The iPad version provides the same functionality, just on a larger screen.

I won’t review all the capabilities here as you can read about those in the original article. The short description is this:

The @BullseyeCamera is like having an extra set of eyes down range, closely monitoring (but never criticizing!) every shot you take. (Tweet This)

Here’s what the Bullseye Camera System does, in a nutshell:

  • Watches your target for every shot
  • Tracks the exact location of each hit in the target area
  • Beams that information back to your shooting bench location
  • Displays a real-time view, on a laptop or netbook computer, of each shot taken

Well, life has gotten better. When I first got my hands on the system, it required a Windows-based computer, laptop or netbook to run the software. That was OK as I had a small netbook available to lug to the range. Now, Bullseye Camera has released both iPhone and iPad versions of the software. So you no longer need to bring a laptop to the range – your iPhone will work just fine by itself. If you want a larger screen, then bring an iPad.

You can find the iOS application free here. Of course, you need the Bullseye Camera hardware to use it.

The downrange part of the Bullseye Camera setup.

The downrange part of the Bullseye Camera setup.

Bullseye Camera is hard at work on Android and Mac OS versions of the software too. We’ll give you a heads up as soon as those are available.

Quiet Recoil Reduction From Silencerco

And the deluge of announcements for SHOT Show 2014 begins…

Both the Silencerco Harvester and Harvester Big Bore (shown here) have a nifty and quite cool looking integrated muzzle brake.

Both the Silencerco Harvester and Harvester Big Bore (shown here) have a nifty and quite cool looking integrated muzzle brake.

From one of the most innovative companies out there comes two new silencers optimized for hunting applications. That baffle-ey thing on the front? That’s an integrated muzzle brake to help control felt recoil. The Silencerco Harvester and Harvester Big Bore will be available starting in February.

Of course, the BATFE will do everything in their power to delay you taking possession for some unreasonable amount of time. Word on the street is that Class III Trust electronic tax stamp applications are getting turned around in a couple of months, so look into that. We’ll be doing an article on Gun Trusts in the near future.

The Harvester is a .30 caliber bore with a thread mount for numerous barrel sizes using a modular thread adapter. The silencer is 8.8 inches long, but weights in at only 11 ounces. That’s light. It’ll knock 21.1 to 33.6 dB off the muzzle blast sound depending on which specific caliber you’re using.

The Harvester Big Bore features a .338 caliber bore, but more importantly adds mounting options beyond a simple thread mount. As a result, it’s heavier, weighing in at about 22 ounces. It’s also a bit longer – 10 inches total.

I’m looking forward to (hopefully) shooting these at SHOT Show Media Day next week. More on that soon…

Vanquest MOLLE Sticks: They Will Save Your Sanity

At a recent Gunsite event hosted by my friends at LaserMax, I met Alex. He’s a gear head from Vanquest. But he doesn’t have greasy fingernails or smell like brake fluid, because his gear specialty is packs, bags, totes, backpacks and cases of all sorts.

Anyway, Alex showed me a sooper-dooper nifty little invention that it sure to save your sanity: MOLLE Sticks.

Two five-inch MOLLE Sticks. Shown here not hooking anything up so you can actually see them.

Two five-inch MOLLE Sticks. Shown here not hooking anything up so you can actually see them.

If you own a bag with all sorts of canvas straps all over it, it’s most likely MOLLE compatible. I’m pretty sure MOLLE stands for Militaristic Odor-eaters for Linsday Lohan Lawn tractor Excursions.

Or maybe it’s MOdular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment. You see, as cool as they are, our military Department of Namers-of-things always cheats on acronyms. There’s no “O” word in there, they just shamelessly borrow the one in “modular.”

Anyway, if you have a backpack, briefcase, camera bag, medical kit, bug out bag or MK-19 Automatic Grenade Launcher case with all these MOLLE straps, then maybe you’ve tried to hook some other pouch, canteen or perhaps a stuffed lemming to your bag. If you have, then you know it’s more annoying than all those home-made cartoons popping up all over Facebook.

Enter the sticks.

As opposed to a canvas strap that you have to wind through all those MOLLE loops, when there is no space whatsoever between the two surfaces, the MOLLE Sticks are made from slippery polymer. You simply push them through, in and out of the loops. When you hit the end, just push down the snap on the end to lock the stick in place.

Here I've used two MOLLE sticks to attach a Vanquest ISOPOD fold up pouch to my Vanquest Javelin VSlinger pack. Two other MOLLE sticks are shown beside.

Here I’ve used two MOLLE sticks to attach a Vanquest ISOPOD fold up pouch to my Vanquest Javelin VSlinger pack. Two other MOLLE sticks are shown beside.

It’s crazy easy to attach your MOLLE gear however you want – no matter how tight the loops are. And with these, the tighter the better, so your gear doesn’t jingle around.

The even better part is the instant removal. Whatever your reasons – simple pack reconfiguration, or maybe something really important like removing a modular medical kit – just unsnap the MOLLE Stick and it slides right out. The gear can be removed instantly.

Love, love, love these. You can get them from Vanquest here.

You don’t have to thank me, just consider this tip one of the many free benefits of Obamacare.

By the way, the pack and pouch shown here are two other nifty Vanquest products – the Vanquest Javelin VSlinger pack and the Vanquest ISOPOD fold up pouch. We’ll be reviewing those over at Bearing Arms.