Blackhawk! Diversion Rolling Load Out Bag

BH_65DC70BKRD_Diversion_Rolling_Loadout_Horizontal_Wgun_R

New for 2015 is a jumbo-sized black rifle carry bag. You might have seen other carry packs and bags in the Blackhawk! Diversion line, like the “tennis racket” black rifle case. As the “Diversion” name implies, the whole idea is to make carry bags that don’t look all tactical. Live in an apartment or have nosey neighbors next door? No problem, with the Blackhawk! Diversion line you can tote your rifles around in plain sight and no one will be the wiser.

The new 2015 model is the Diversion Rolling Load Out Bag. As you might guess by the name, it’s got urethane wheels to tote its rated 200 pounds of whatever you want to put in it. The rifle compartment is full size, so you don’t have to separate upper and lower receivers as with smaller diversion bags. The gun compartment has a muzzle pouch and straps that lock your rifle in place while you transport. It’s available in various colors including black/grey, black/red and blue/grey. It looks like an ordinary suitcase, so no worries about being outed as the neighborhood tactical dude or dudette.

It’s just coming into the distribution channel so you’ll see it soon at online and local retailers. For now, you can find more information here. MSRP is $399.99.

Pic of the Day: Ankles of Doom

Galco Ankle Glove Ruger LCR 357 Hornady Critical Defense

My favorite ankle carry setup? That’s easy. It’s a combination of the Galco Ankle Glove ankle holster, Ruger LCR 357 and Hornady Critical Defense 357 Magnum ammo.

I like the ankle glove for a number of reasons. The band is neoprene lined inside with sheepskin, so it’s stable and comfortable – even in hot weather. The gun holster is made from sturdy leather and perfectly fit for specific guns. Best of all, the holster compartment is molded completely outside of the ankle band, so your gun doesn’t press into your leg. When I’m wearing boots, I use the Ankle Glove as is. When wearing lower cut shoes, I add the Galco Calf Strap to hold the rig higher on my leg, so it’s not visible.

The extra ammo is carried on a Bianchi Speed Strip, which holds six rounds flat, so they fit comfortably in your pants pocket. Speaking of ammo, I like the Hornady Critical Defense 357 Magnum round as its power factor is somewhere between .38 Special +P and a full-power .357 Magnum. You can actually shoot it from the Ruger LCR 357 with good control.

At some point, I’ll have to add the Crimson Trace Lasergrip to the Ruger LCR 357 to complete the package.

Savage Expands Ready to Shoot Line with Two New Rimfire Rifles

Savage Rimfire Package rifles

Savage Rimfire Package rifles

Now that rimfire ammunition is starting to appear on the shelves again, it’s a good time to look at new .22 rifles. Just landing in my inbox is an announcement from Savage Arms about two new rimfire package rifles. By “package” I mean ready to shoot, complete with optics. It can’t get simpler than that.

Also see: How to Find 22LR Ammo

The Mark II FXP in 22 Long Rifle and 93 FXP in 22 WMR both feature a mounted and boresighted 3-9x40mm Bushnell scope and the famous Savage AccuTrigger. Weighing in at about six pounds, the bolt guns feature a 1-in-16 inch rate of twist and 21 inch barrel length to maximize rimfire velocity. Overall length is 39.5 inches and both rifles include a five round detachable magazine.

While similar designs, the .22LR Mark II FXP comes with an olive drab stock and bull barrel. Both rifles have an MSRP of 300 bucks give or take a few. You should be able to find them on the street for somewhat less.

Pic of the Day: Gun and Golf Club Grips

Teacup grip golf club

It doesn’t make much sense to use a cup and saucer grip on a golf club. It makes just as little sense to use a that teacup grip on a gun. The “cup” of your support hand really doesn’t accomplish much of anything in either scenario.

Want to learn a proper grip? Download our free eBook, A Fistful of Shooting Tips!

Hollywood Gets It Right! 7 Examples of Realistic Gun Movie Scenes

Given enough time and typewriters, a barrel of monkeys could write the script for Dumb and Dumber. I’m guessing it might take three monkeys with a used Smith-Corona Speedline about an hour. Following similar logic, with enough movies, even the folks in Hollywood are bound to get some gun handling scenes right.

It’s probably too much to ask for those folks to get a whole movie right when it comes to guns, so I’ll focus on scenes only here – a few shining examples of where they managed to recreate realistic gun scenes.

Air Force One: Trigger discipline!

Here’s one from a movie that made The Top 9 Worst Hollywood Gun Scenes Ever list a couple of weeks ago.

Air Force Major Caldwell (William H. Macy) displays some actual trigger discipline when the @ss-kicking President (Harrison Ford) hands him an MP5A3. Believe it or not, Caldwell aligns his trigger finger along the receiver as they head off into the plane to kick some terrorist butt.

William Macy in Air Force One

 

Act of Valor: All of it.

The movie Act of Valor was made by a couple of former Hollywood stunt men with cooperation by the US Navy. In fact, all military personnel in the movie are played by active military personnel. That’s right; there are hardly any real actors in this movie, which explains why the gun handling is so good throughout. It also explains why the acting leaves a little bit to be desired, but that’s OK. As a side note, it took over two years to film the movie because the actors (all US Navy SEALs) had to keep going on deployments overseas.

Not only are the actors actual SEALs, many of the scenes in the movie were filmed using live fire. Rather than mock up everything for a movie, the producers filmed a number of live training exercises.

I’m only identifying scenes in this movie as I promised scenes only at the beginning of this article, but the whole movie is on target so to speak. Here are a couple of my favorites:

Blanks? Who needs blanks? When the SEALS lay down a little bit of covering fire on the bad guys from their boat-mounted General Dynamics GAU-17/As, you’ll see real brass flying, not that crimped nose movie prop stuff. That was one of the live fire scenes, and it sure was impressive.

Real pros use semi-automatic, aimed fire. You’ll see this throughout the movie, along with actual magazine changes. This scene shows a brief example of the good guys aiming at bad guys and using rapid semi-automatic fire for maximum effect.

As you might expect, the gun handling in this movie almost qualifies as an instructional class as opposed to entertainment. In another scene, two of the heroes even manage to execute perfect muzzle discipline while diving away from a terrorist suicide bomber. That’s focus!

Read the rest at OutdoorHub!

 

Be sure to check out our latest books! They are ON SALE now for a limited time!

Pic of the Day: A Competition Shotgun from FNH?

 

This FNH SC-1 Competition Shotgun has been busy!

This FNH SC-1 Competition Shotgun has been busy!

You probably know FN from their massive military contracts. Or perhaps their pistols. Or maybe their tactical shotguns. But they also make an excellent competition clays shotgun – the SC-1.

We’re finishing up a full review on this one for GunsAmerica and it’s a beauty. Stay tuned…

How to Find 22LR Ammo

This is 2,900 newly purchased rounds of .22LR ammo. It might last me a month.

This is 2,900 newly-purchased rounds of .22LR ammo. It might last me a month.

This is a real, un-doctored photo, taken just this morning. This ammo was purchased Wednesday evening. Really. And I could have bought more.

Yes, .22LR ammunition is a lot more scarce than it used to be, especially those bulk packs of Winchester, Remington and Federal. But just because you don’t see those 300 and 500 round boxes sitting on the Wal-Mart shelf doesn’t mean that .22LR ammo isn’t available. It is. You can get all you want, with two conditions:

  1. You have to work harder to find it.
  2. You have to pay more.

It’s a basic economics decision. You can clutch the memories of old prices while sitting at home not shooting your .22s, or you can accept the new reality and shoot. Your choice.

I’m going to work harder and pay a little more because I really like shooting my .22s. I’m not going to hoard what I have and continue to buy ammo to squirrel away – that’s exactly what’s causing this problem for all of us. I’m going to shoot my .22s and have fun doing it. As I write this, I’m testing a CMMG .22 conversion kit for AR rifles, the new Smith & Wesson M&P 22 Compact with a SilencerCo Sparrow and a Ruger 10/22 with a Timney Trigger upgrade. I intend to shoot lots and lots of .22LR through these guns.

Subscribe to the emails

I few months ago, I got an email from Cabelas letting me know that they had 2,000 round cans of Federal Champion .22LR ammo. I clicked, and a ton of .22LR ammo was on its way for a good price. Subscribe to emails from companies like Cabelas, Webyshops and Brownells, and you just might be surprised at what lands in your inbox. Most companies place a lot of value of their email subscribers and are more than happy to tell them first about new product availability. It’s a win-win – help them communicate with you! Just be sure to keep a close eye on your inbox as you’ll need to act fast.

Grand openings

New stores are opening all over. Chains like Academy Sports, Bass Pro, Cabelas and Gander Mountain can’t build new locations fast enough. Guess what? When they have a grand opening for a new location, they want to create excitement and buzz. Every single grand opening I’ve attended in the past year has managed to offer plentiful supplies of .22LR ammunition. In fact, the ammo in the picture above was purchased at the Grand Opening event of a new Palmetto State Armory store here in South Carolina. Keep an eye on the news and make time to attend. It’s fun, and you’re sure to find some deals.

Set product alerts

Brownells has a neat feature (and plenty of other retailers do also) that allows you to set an automated alert for out of stock products. Use it. You’ll get a text message or email as soon as new product arrives and can be the first to order. I use this all the time with great success. You never know when an alert will come in, so again, keep an eye on that inbox and act fast.

Set alerts like this one at Brownells so you can be notified immediately when the ammo you want is in stock.

Set alerts like this one at Brownells so you can be notified immediately when the ammo you want is in stock.

GunBot.net

Here’s a great example of American ingenuity that solves a frustrating problem. The creators of GunBot.net have established wonder-magic connections to dozens and dozens of online retailers for ammunition. Their website checks availability and pricing of ammunition, magazines and reloading supplies. All you have to do is visit gunbot.net, and you’ll see a consolidated list of retailers that have the products you’re looking for. You can display in-stock products only and sort by price per round. Just click and you’re linked to that particular retailer to place your order. Couldn’t be easier. As of today, you’ll see that you can buy all the .22LR ammo you want for about $.10 per round. Yes, that’s more than it used to cost. Get used to it – it’s still half the price of centerfire ammo. Oh, and don’t gripe at the GunBot.net folks about prices, they don’t set them, they just link you to the folks who do. Make it a point to check GunBot.net a couple times a day and you might find a deal closer to the “old” prices.

These are a couple of the methods I use to shop for my .22LR ammo. I’ve yet to run out, and shoot my .22s as much as ever.

New Bullets from PolyCase Ammunition

New 9mm Firefly tracer ammunition (left) and ARX self-defense ammunition (right)

New 9mm Firefly tracer ammunition (left) and ARX self-defense ammunition (right)

Remember PolyCase Ammunition? They’re the folks that developed disposable polymer cases for a variety of rifle and pistol cartridges. When the great ammunition crunch of 2013 hit, PolyCase, like other ammunition manufacturers, had trouble obtaining the components to load cartridges in the polymer cases. Turning frustration into opportunity, the PolyCase team set about inventing their own projectiles. Like their previous work with breakthrough innovation, they’ve figure out how to make projectiles using injection molding techniques. Using a blend of 10% polymer and 90% copper, they create practice, self-defense and tracer projectiles by molding them from liquid goo. According to the company, accuracy is improved as the molding process avoids traditional challenges of weight variation and concentricity anomalies.

The groundbreaking concept behind this it that PolyCase can make the projectiles into virtually any shape they want as the injection molding process is not limited by traditional stamping techniques. The Inceptor ARX self-defense projectile resembles a drill bit and is designed to provide directional and rotational energy transfer to the target. The light weight, lead-free projectiles still penetrate to FBI standards as they are not designed to expand in the traditional sense.

For more information, visit PolyCase Ammunition.

Movies and Gun Blunders

thriller on tvYou know what they say: You can’t believe everything you see on TV. That’s knowledge to keep in hand, for while the folks in Hollywood do have a wonderful flair for the dramatic, no one has ever accused them of being realistic.

Carrying and shooting guns is serious business. It’s crucial that every gun owner learn safe practices from the right sources—and that source does not generally include something you see in your downtown theater. Let’s consider a few Hollywood gun blunders and discuss why they’re such bad practices.

1.      Shooting without Hearing Protection!—One entertaining shooting scene comes from the movie Mr. and Mrs. Smith starring Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie. They’re a married couple, but each is a spy for a competing consortium. To make a long story short, they end up resolving their differences with a shootout, against each other, in their otherwise quiet suburban home. While Brad planned ahead and fought his spy-bride with a suppressed pistol, Angelina blasted away at spy-boy Brad with a 12-gauge shotgun.

You know it’s Hollywood when, after a big shootout, you never hear the characters saying, “Wait? What? I can’t hear you!” Yeah, I know, Brad and Angie wouldn’t have looked nearly so sexy wearing earmuffs and safety glasses, but that doesn’t give us real-life shooters a pass.

If you’ve ever shot indoors, it’s loud even with hearing protection. Outside shooting isn’t much better and often worse, depending on the firearm and caliber. Let’s be clear: Without hearing protection, each and every shot you endure—and this is whether you shoot on an indoor range or outside—may cause cumulative or permanent hearing loss. Always, always wear hearing protection, indoor range to pheasant field, whitetail deer stand to skeet range, .22-caliber to .50-caliber and everything in between.

Read the rest in the October 2014 National Shooting Sports Foundation First Shots newsletter!

Pic of the Day: A Pair of Beretta Pistols

A Pair of Berettas: The 92FS 9mm and 3032 Tomcat in .32 ACP.

A Pair of Berettas: The 92FS 9mm and 3032 Tomcat in .32 ACP.

A primary and backup gun perhaps? Shown here are the Beretta 92FS and Beretta 3031 Tomcat.

The Beretta 92FS is a full size 9mm with 15+1 capacity and perhaps the most comfortable to shoot 9mm I own. The Tomcat is a .32 ACP pocket gun with a unique tip-up barrel design. While you can rack the slide to chamber a round, you don’t need to. Just insert a loaded magazine, flip the barrel release and it will open, exposing the chamber. Drop in a round and you’re good to go. Couldn’t be simpler. You can read more about the Tomcat here.

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