About Tom McHale

My Gun Culture is an irreverent look at news bordering on the ridiculous, shootin' stuff, loud noises, defending your own, the occasional mall ninja, and about 200 years of the American way. These are the (partially) true stories of... My Gun Culture.

Written by a conservative gun-totin' bible-clingin' literary assault dude who enjoys finding humor in just about anything.

The Sound of Silence: The American Suppressor Association

What's more fun than .300 AAC Blackout full automatic? suppressed? Not much.

What’s more fun than .300 AAC Blackout full automatic with a suppressor? Not much.

On Day -1 of the annual NRA Meeting, I had the opportunity to attend a media event sponsored by  the American Suppressor Association. If you’re not already familiar, the group is a consortium of companies in the sound suppression business that aim to reduce the noise level of gunfire everywhere.

This event was held at the Atterbury Fish and Wildlife Area range – an absolutely fantastic outdoor facility complete with full-time range safety officers, baffles to prevent stray shots from escaping and a Pro Shop that was well stocked with… powder. If you’re a reloader, you know what I’m talking about. No one has powder these days! Except Atterbury.

SilencerCo Osprey (top) and SilencerCo / SWR Octane (bottom)

SilencerCo Osprey (top) and SilencerCo / SWR Octane (bottom)

The American Suppressor Association is a great example of companies working together to achieve a common goal. In this case it’s the growth and acceptance of silencers as a normal part of shooting. Who would think of buying a simple lawn mower without a muffler? It’s the same idea with silencers. Shooting suppressed guns is safe and polite to the neighbors. In their words…

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THE COMMERCIAL SILENCER INDUSTRY’S 103 YEAR HISTORY, INDIVIDUAL MANUFACTURERS, DISTRIBUTORS, AND DEALERS ARE FORMALLY BANDING TOGETHER TO COLLECTIVELY ADVOCATE FOR THE SILENCER INDUSTRY.

Most states have some provision for citizens to legally acquire silencers for their firearms. At last count, it was 39 out of 50, although that number may increase any day thanks to the efforts of of American Silencer Association activists. Hunting with silencers is a different matter. Regulations are all over the map. These types of inconsistencies are exactly what the American silencer association is trying to fix. One example of a recent when is the passage of legislation in Georgia that allows hunting with silencers. Yay! Another win!

In attendance at today’s event were member companies SilencerCo, Advanced Armament Corporation, GemTech and Daniel Defense. All had a wide variety of products to test. Everything from .22 pistols to H&K full-auto 300 Blackout rifles.

Yeah, it was fun. And quiet.

New From The NRA Annual Meeting: Daniel Defense Offers Custom Finishes

Daniel Defense DDM4v9LW with new Tornado finish.

Daniel Defense DDM4v9LW with new Tornado finish.

I have a mental block. A lot of them actually. But one prevents me from doing anything to a brand new factory gun. The finish is perfect after all, as all the parts were done professionally at time of manufacture. It seems such a shame to mess with it. That would be like taking your new Dodge Charger to Maaco for a paint job, right?

While Cerakote provides amazing personalization options, I’ve only really considered doing it to well-used guns. Now Daniel Defense is expanding the selection of factory-applied Cerakote finishes with its Tornado shade of grey. It will be available through Daniel Defense retailers in July on two models, the DDM4v5 and the V9 LW.

The Cerakote finish is the second new color option Daniel Defense has launched this calendar year. Mil Spec +, a flat dark earth variation, was first unveiled at SHOT Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, in January. “When you look for a new car, you have substantially more color options than just black,” noted Jordan Hunter, Daniel Defense Director of Marketing. “Customers want choices other than the mil-spec Type III hard coat anodizing, or matte black, and the Daniel Defense Tornado™, we believe, will be well received by our customers.”

Book Signings and More at the NRA Annual Meetings

Galco Book Signing Event Insanely Practical Guides Tom McHaleI’m happy.

I think it’s because, thanks to the folks at Galco and Flashbang (two of my favorite holster makers and all around swell folks), I’ll have the opportunity to meet all sorts of NRA Annual Meeting attendees. I’ll be doing daily book signing events at both Galco and Flashbang booths and offering special deals for all four of our book titles:

The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters, 2nd Edition

The Rookie’s Guide to Guns and Shooting, Handgun Edition

The Insanely Practical Guide to Reloading

The Rookie’s Guide to the Springfield Armory XD-S

Although insanely chaotic, I LOVE the NRA Annual Meeting. You’ll see people from all walks of life mingling together like it’s no big deal. New products, seminars, gun giveaways, nice people – the Annual Meeting has it all.

We’ll be covering the event here and at our social media outlets. You can also keep up with Daily articles at Beretta USA. Early next week, we’ll do a “Best of NRA Annual Meeting” wrap up over at OutdoorHub.

If you’re gonna be at the NRA Annual Meeting, stop by one of the book signings and say  hello – I’d love to meet you in person!

Friday

Galco, Booth 5464 10-11am

Flashbang Holsters / Looper Brand, Booth 4401 3-4pm

Saturday

Galco, Booth 5464 10-11am

Flashbang Holsters / Looper Brand, Booth 4401 4-5pm

Sunday

Galco, Booth 5464 10-11am

Flashbang Holsters / Looper Brand, Booth 4401 2-3pm

Hope to see you there!

Shooting Myth: Competitive Shooting Will Get You Killed On the Street

Competitive Shooting is not only fun, it can help you build basic skills.

Competitive Shooting is not only fun, it can help you build basic skills.

Why is it that Internet opinions are so binary? Black or white, right or wrong, my way or the highway – it’s kind of like politics in the real world.

  • 45 is the only caliber! Because you only need to shoot once!
  • 9mm is fantastic – if you want to shoot balloons.
  • Competitive shooting skills will get you killed on the street!

As with anything in life, there is rarely all right or all wrong. I tend to think in terms of better, better still, and even more better. Or on the flip side, I like to consider worse, way worse, and worse than Piers Morgan’s ratings.

Listening to Internet arguments about the merits of competitive shooting, one might think that if you practice competition skills, you’ll instantly burst into flames and self-immolate should you find yourself in a self-defense situation.

A few weeks ago, I was watching an episode of Shooting USA with my college-age son and his roommates. We were having a great time – me feeling young, hip and cool, and them looking at their watches every few minutes.

Anyway, this particular Shooting USA episode included coverage of the IDPA Indoor Championships. If you don’t know, IDPA stands for International Defensive Pistol Association. In their words,

IDPA is the use of practical equipment including full charge service ammunition to solve simulated “real world” self-defense scenarios using practical handguns and holsters that are suitable for self-defense use. The main goal is to test the skill and ability of an individual.

In other words, it’s a competition structured to partially mimic potential real-life defensive encounters. In the interest of making competitions fun and stimulating, the “real-life” part tends to get a little stretched now and then.

For example, at the IDPA Indoor National Championships, one stage in particular appeared immensely fun, but just a tad outside the bounds of reality. It was an example of duck hunting gone horribly wrong. The shooter is placed in a duck blind, when suddenly a band of terrorists (or maybe hunting thugs intent on duck-jacking) makes their way across the front of your blind in a tactical rowboat. You have a short window of opportunity to deal with them as the entrance and exit of the “battle boat” are obscured with weeds or some form of aquatic plant life. Oh, there’s a hostage in the boat-jacking scenario that you can’t shoot. No word if that’s supposed to represent Uncle Si from Duck Dynasty.

Your mission, and you WILL accept it as you’re competing in the IDPA Indoor National Championships, is to take out the Duck Commandos as quickly as you can, without shooting Uncle Si, and before the boatload of doom escapes into the weeds.

Lest you think this sounds easy, the Duck Commandos planned in advance and had sniper over watch. When you start perforating the rowboat, the accomplices pop up all over the place from their hides, and you have to take them out too. You have to reload at least once in the process of filling the room with smoke and that delicious powder smell. Yum! I love the smell of what bad and uninformed novelists call cordite in the morning!

Read the rest at OutdoorHub!

Gun Crime, Pabst Blue Ribbon and Mikey on the Hamster Wheel

New York Safe ActGun Crime makes me sick.

But just the “crime” part, not the “gun” part.

If I hear someone say “gun crime” or “gun deaths” one more time, I’m gonna start puking up bearded Llama puppies. (Tweet This) Do you call the little ones puppies? I’m not sure, but I’ll be ejecting them from my mouth none-the-less.

The whole “about to vomit” thing comes from the fact that I can’t get my laparoscopic adjustable gastric band around the fact that…

People believe that if you remove the “gun” part, the crimes won’t happen. Poof! They disappear! Kind of like Benghazi witnesses. (Tweet This)

To me, that’s like believing you can wave a magic scepter to vanquish all of the Pabst Blue Ribbon DUI’s. Do you think this would reduce the number of drunks on the road? Seriously? At best, it would simply improve the “quality” of drunkenness. More people would be drinking beer of better repute once PBR has been removed from the supply chain.

If you were paying attention to the PBR analogy, you probably figured out what happens when Pabst becomes extinct. People drink other types of beer. Like National Bohemian. Some might even switch to hard cider if they’re feeling really rambunctious.

Of course you could ban all the cheap beers, and cider too. But folks would simply start drinking the hard stuff.

Heck, some people might even drop those little umbrellas in their cocktails – and that would be tragic indeed.

Do you see where this is going? It’s an endless game of trying to remove objects associated with bad behavior, while blissfuly ignoring the fact that behavior is, well, a behavioral problem. You can ban one object, only to have the problem continue with different objects. It reminds me of a dog chasing it’s tail. Or Harry Reid continuing to insist that people love Obamacare.

I like to picture a miniature Michael Bloomberg (yeah, I know, he’s kind a Napoleonic mini-tyrant anyway) running in one of those hamster wheels. He runs, and runs, but never accomplishes anything. Run Mikey, run!

And therein lies the problem.

Drunk driving is a behavioral problem. Removing one type of drunk juice from the equation solves nothing. Heck, we tried to remove all the drunk juice from the equation and that was a miserable failure. Can you say Prohibition? The behavior never went away.

Crime is also a behavioral problem. Removing guns, or placing restrictions on them does not remove evil intent from the hearts of darkness.(Tweet This)

You can ban all the guns you want, but nothing positive has ever been accomplished by that. Australia did it. Crime went up. The UK did it. Crime went up.

I think the primary argument of the gun ban crowd is based on this flawed assumption. If you remove guns, then any crimes previously associated with guns will simply not happen.

This flawed assumption smacked me upside the head with a recent discussion with Phil the Australian. Phil seems to be a really nice guy, and I enjoyed a very polite and civil discussion with him online. I’d like to meet him over a good Australian beer. I hear they don’t really like Fosters over there — apparently it’s for tourists or something — so if we ever meet in person, I’ll trust him completely on his selection of beverage.

The basic gist of my part of the discussion was this.

Let’s suppose we live in Obama-Topia, a place with 100 murders per year, and 70 of those murders involve guns and 30 some other murderous weapon. Now, we get smart, and use our disappearing gun ray to remove all the guns. Yet, we still have 100 murders a year, but none of them involve guns. Yay! Zero gun deaths! But the people who have been “death-ed” by some means other than guns really don’t feel much better, do they?

My point is, both Australia and the UK have had either unchanged, or in the case of the UK, INCREASING murder rates since their major gun control initiatives. Guns or no guns. In fact, in the UK, the “gun related” murder rate has actually gone up since their gun ban. And of course their overall murder rate has gone UP since their gun ban. Australia’s has stayed relatively flat before, during and after.

By the way, things like assault and forcible rape are 2 to 4 times more likely in the UK and Australia, respectively, as the US. Just sayin’ you know.(Tweet This)

Another side note, gun ownership in Australia is essentially back to where it was before the 96/97 buyback, yet the murder rate really hasn’t changed as a percentage. Huh? If you’re going to make major changes, you would expect the crime rates to change as a result, no?

So, if crime, murder, rape, assault, armed robbery et al. do not change regardless of the tools used, who cares?

I want CRIME down. Not gun crime. Or electric stapler crime. Or Silly Putty crime.(Tweet This)

The only thing that’s relevant is the overall crime rate.

If I’m to be murdered, I certainly won’t consider it a moral victory if I’m murdered with something other than a gun. If I’m the murderee, then a gun control policy that ensures I was murdered with something other than a gun really doesn’t help me.

The flaw in the gun ban argument is that if you remove the guns (or knives, or electric staplers) then those types of crimes go away. They don’t.

That. Has. Never. Happened. Ever.

Because you can’t solve a behavioral problem without addressing the, ummm, behavior.

Grab a copy of my free eBook, A Fistful of Shooting Tips. It will help make you a better shooter and the envy of your range in no time.

R.I.P. One AR-15 Rifle – Another 300 Blackout / .223 Kaboom

I’ve read a few stories recently about someone, somewhere, shoving a 300 AAC Blackout cartridge into a .223 / 5.56mm rifle and pulling the trigger – subsequently blowing their gun to bits. Some folks call BS and say it can’t happen as the rifle won’t go into battery and fire.

Well, I’m a believer now, considering a guy 3 lanes down from me blew up his fairly nice looking AR today. In the confusion, I was not able to get the brand of the rifle, but that matters little. Containing 55,000 pounds per square inch of pressure is not in the job description.

This was the round below the cartridge bomb in the magazine. I found it on the ground amongst lotsa small pieces of magazine, spring and follower. And quite a few case fragments. As you can see, it absorbed some violence.

This was the round below the cartridge bomb in the magazine. I found it on the ground amongst lotsa small pieces of magazine, spring and follower – and quite a few case fragments. As you can see, it absorbed some serious violence.

I was pretty occupied with my own business, gleefully trying out two new SilencerCo silencers for which I’ve waited about 10 months. A 22 Sparrow SS and an Octane 45 by the way. And yes, they’re awesome. Happiness = That feeling when your slide cycling makes more noise than the gun shot. That nirvana was achieved with a Smith & Wesson M&P22 with a SilencerCo Sparrow using Aguila Subsonic 60 grain .22LR ammunition.

Suddenly I heard a “splosion” noise and a scream from a few lanes to my right. Running over to see what happened, I saw a man holding his hand and obviously somewhat shaken up. I immediately started looking at his face as he was somewhat disoriented and all was clear there. His left (support) hand looked like he had fondled a few bricks of charcoal for a while. Thankfully, and maybe miraculously, no cuts or blood anywhere. While his hand was “stinging like crazy” in his words, there did not appear to be any burns of consequence. This is one incredibly lucky guy, especially since I can’t be sure he was wearing shooting glasses. The way they were placed on the table, I’m not sure he had them on when he blew up the rifle.

Here’s the apparent sequence of events, picked up from listening to the rifle owner and the shooter.

The owner had two uppers at the range. A .223 and a 300 AAC Blackout. He obviously hand loads as there were 100 round ammo boxes of each type nearby.

The shooter appeared to be new and somewhat inexperienced. I can’t be sure, that’s just an observation from seeing the interaction after the kaboom. Either the shooter picked up a magazine full of 300 Blackout cartridges, or the rifle owner handed him a magazine loaded with Blackouts. I can’t be sure. They weren’t sure themselves.

The shooter loaded the magazine of 300 Blackouts in the .223, chambered a round, and fired. Then the Kaboom. I was not able to discern, nor was the owner, whether the shooter felt anything abnormal trying to chamber the first round. As  the shooter appeared to be inexperienced, I’m not sure they will ever sort that out.

Once we determined the shooter was physically OK, I wanted to get out of their business, so I didn’t get any photos of the rifle, but I can describe the damage. In short, it was pretty much totaled. Perhaps the Magpul front hand guard, rear stock and trigger group can be salvaged. That’s about it.

Here's a .223 Remington cartridge dropped into a 5.56mm chamber.

Here’s a .223 Remington cartridge dropped into a 5.56mm chamber.

The magazine blew up, along with spring and follower. And you can see what happened to the other rounds in the picture here. I *believe* the fact that he was using a polymer magazine may have saved the shooter from additional injury. The explosion clearly took the path of least resistance. Perhaps a metal magazine would have allowed more pressure to go in other directions in addition to out the magazine well.

The magazine well on the lower was bulged out. Kind of like an Elmer Fudd cartoon shotgun.

The upper receiver was also bulged out from the explosion.

The bolt and carrier were both trashed – bent all to hell and completely stuck in the upper and barrel extension.

I assume the barrel extension and barrel were trashed, but as everything was fused together, there was no way to tell for sure until they rip things apart. Shoving a .308 inch diameter bullet into a .223 inch hole is asking for damage I would think.

While I was not shocked at the damage to the aluminum upper and lower, I was surprised at how much the bolt carrier and bolt were trashed. That’s hard stuff there.

Here's a 125 grain 300 Blackout cartridge dropped into the same 5.56mm chamber. Too close for comfort?

Here’s a 125 grain 300 Blackout cartridge dropped into the same 5.56mm chamber. Too close for comfort?

With the brief opportunity I had to look, that’s about all I could tell. But now I was curious. Would similar rounds allow the .223 rifle to go into battery? I decided to try under much safer conditions.

After removing the bolt and carrier from my Smith & Wesson M&P 15 VTAC (5.56 chamber) I dropped in a .223 Remington round to get a rough visual on where it sat. OK, that worked fine, as expected. Next, I dropped a variety of 300 AAC Blackout loads into the chamber, exerting no pressure at all and just letting the round fall. As expected, the big subsonic rounds didn’t get close to proper depth, however some of the longer and skinnier bullet profiles did – mainly the 110 and 125 grain ballistic tip bullet types. Not to the full and proper depth, but close. Close enough where a little encouragement by an inexperienced shooter could force the bolt into battery.

Lessons?

Wear eye protection. Always. This guy won the lucky human award today and I don’t think that’s given out more than once per lifetime.

When bringing a new shooter to the range, hover over them like a helicopter parent. At least until they gain some knowledge and proficiency.

If you own both rifles, figure out your own method for segregation. Perhaps wrap the Blackout magazines with colored tape, or put a colored base plate on them so they’re easily visible.

It might not be a terrible idea to take one or the other rifles to the range, but not both on the same visit.

Whattdya think?

Grab a copy of my free eBook, A Fistful of Shooting Tips. It will help make you a better shooter and the envy of your range in no time.

Tennis Anyone? The Award Winning Blackhawk! Diversion Concealed Carry Rifle Case

Talk about the ultimate diversion!

We covered some of the Blackhawk! Division concealed carry products in the brand new 2nd Edition of the Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters. Just today, I saw that the Blackhawk! Diversion line won the prestigious NRA Shooting Illustrated Golden Bullseye award for 2014. Well deserved – these products are fantastic and will blend right in to the urban and suburban lifestyle.

We saw the Blackhawk! Diversion rifle case at SHOT Show 2013 and it’s stunningly effective for toting an AR type rifle. It looks like a tennis racquet case, so un-enlightened neighbors won’t freak out and call Mayor Bloomberg when you pack your car for a range trip.

The bag itself is padded and features an internal divider, so you can carry two firearms. The case holds a gun up to 29 inches long, so the idea is to carry a separated upper and lower receiver. The zippers are lockable so you can secure the bag from children or nosy line judges.

The Blackhawk! Diversion Carry Racquet Bag. Image: Blackhawk!

The Blackhawk! Diversion Carry Racquet Bag. Image: Blackhawk!

As of this writing, the cases are available in two-tone red/grey and blue/grey color schemes. Word has it that a black/grey one will be out in the future.

This is a fantastic idea and a great way to discreetly carry your rifle in plain sight.

Tennis anyone?

Be sure to check out our new 2nd Edition for 2014 book, The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters. It will teach you all the major methods of concealed carry and walk you through pros and cons over 100 different holster models. It’s available in print and Kindle format at Amazon:

Now available in print! The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters

Now available in print! The Insanely Practical Guide to Gun Holsters

The Looper Prohibition Capone Holster

The Prohibition Capone holster is an inside the waistband hybrid design, featuring a tough leather backing and Kydex mold for the gun pocket. Metal clips, fastened at the bottom only, fasten to the belt, allowing your shirt to be tucked in over the gun and behind the clips.

Only you will see it, but you can choose red or blue stitching for the Capone hybrid holster. Image: Flashbang Holsters.

Only you will see it, but you can choose red or blue stitching for the Capone hybrid holster. Image: Flashbang Holsters.

I’ve been using a top-secret version of this for a large gun and have found it to be comfortable and solid. The leather backing is stiff and will require a little break-in period to adjust to your body shape. This is a good thing – you want tough leather for longevity and support of your gun.

Like the other Looper products we’ve tested, this one is highly recommended. The fit, finish and attention to detail are outstanding.

Celebrating Diversity with the 300 AAC Blackout

The most interesting thing about the 300 AAC Blackout cartridge is the diversity of projectiles and velocities. Left to right: .223 Remington Hornady A-Max, 300 Blackout 125 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip, 300 Blackout Cooper Cartridge 245 grain subsonic, 300 Blackout 220 grain Sierra MatchKing subsonic

The most interesting thing about the 300 AAC Blackout cartridge is the diversity of projectiles and velocities. Left to right: .223 Remington Hornady A-Max, 300 Blackout 125 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip, 300 Blackout Cooper Cartridge 245 grain subsonic, 300 Blackout 220 grain Sierra MatchKing subsonic

People get all worked up about whether the 300 AAC Blackout is better than the .223 Remington, 5.56mm or perhaps the AK-47’s 7.62x39mm.

I don’t care, mainly because I’m all about celebrating diversity.

To me, the 300 AAC Blackout is a fascinating caliber on it’s own merit. It doesn’t have to be better than any other round. Deciding whether it’s good or not by comparing it to the .223 Remington is like comparing the .357 Magnum to the .44 Special. What’s better?

Neither – they’re just different. And I would include a lot of “quotes” around the “better” part. What’s the purpose? How are you going to use it? What do you like? What gun are you going to shoot?

There’s no universal “better” or “worse” when it comes to caliber comparisons, there are only apples and oranges. As far as I’m concerned, it’s good enough that it’s radically different.

Ballistic Diversity
What puffs up my bloomers about the Blackout is the huge ballistic range from the same carbine, short barrel rifle, or AR platform pistol.

  • You can launch a 110 grain bullet at 2,400 feet per second.
  • You can also launch a 240 grain bullet at 1,000 feet per second.
  • You can do all sorts of things in between, like move a 125 grain projectile at 2,200 feet per second. Or a 150 grain bullet at 2,000 feet per second. Or a 168 grain at 1,700 feet per second. You get the idea.

Note how the ribs in the magazine index on the case mouth for the .223 rounds on in the bottom magazine. The projectiles on 300 Blackout cartridges will most likely touch the ribs, so you may need to experiment a bit.

It’s an interesting caliber that allows one to do a lot of customization for the job at hand.

Read the rest at: http://www.ammoland.com/2014/04/300-aac-blackout-caliber/#ixzz2yxxjSaLw

Reloading Ammunition: The Final Steps, Seating, Crimping and Inspecting

Most seating dies will also crimp in the same step, but I prefer to treat seating and crimping as separate actions.

Most seating dies will also crimp in the same step, but I prefer to treat seating and crimping as separate actions.

Last time we covered the powder charging step and briefly touched on the whole concept of pressure curves. While reloading is a safe pastime when proper care is taken, the care-taking part is a really big deal. The last steps, seating, crimping and inspecting cartridges, are equally important when it comes to safety.

Seating the new bullet

Seating the bullet simply means pressing it into the cartridge case to the proper depth. Precise seating depth is important for a number of reasons. Obviously, the cartridge has to fit in the magazine and/or cylinder and chamber. Far more importantly, the seating depth has a big impact on peak pressure when the cartridge is ignited.

It's important to pay close attention to seating depth because incorrect depths can have dramatic impact on pressure.

It’s important to pay close attention to seating depth because incorrect depths can have dramatic impact on pressure.

The Cartridge Overall Length (C.O.A.L. or C.O.L.) is specified for each type and weight bullet combination as a way to control the interior volume of the cartridge case. Any given published load recipe is carefully developed making an assumption about the volume in the cartridge case. If a bullet is pushed farther into the case, there is less interior volume. If the same amount of powder ignites in a smaller volume, pressure will be have to be higher. Likewise, if a bullet is not pressed in deep enough, there will be more available volume in the case, and pressure will be lower.

Most seating dies actually perform two functions: seating and crimping. If you adjust your die and press exactly right, then you can do both steps at once with good reliability.

I prefer treating these as separate steps – especially for the new reloader. Here’s why. Seating the bullet involves pressing it into the cartridge case. When you’re crimping at the same time, you’re applying inward pressure while also applying downward pressure. So you’ve actually got opposing forces that have to be perfectly timed for a correct result. If small details, like cartridge case length are out of whack just a bit, you can actually create bulges in the case which may prevent the cartridge from chambering properly.

Read the rest at OutdoorHub!

Want to start reloading? Then check out our newest book – The Insanely Practical Guide to Reloading Ammunition – it will help you start reloading in no time!

Learn how to reload ammunition the easy way with the Insanely Practical Guide To Reloading Ammunition!

Learn how to reload ammunition the easy way with the Insanely Practical Guide To Reloading Ammunition!

 

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